Paul Douglas on Weather Logo

Blog

Paul Douglas on Weather

Cold Sunday. Gradual Warming Through the Week.

Sunday Weather Outlook
 
Sunday is going to be a pretty chilly day with highs only warming into the single digits. Wind chill values will likely be in the sub-zero range much of the day as well This will be one of the 3 coldest days we've had so far this season.
 
______________________________________________________________________
 
Saturday Weather Outlook
 
High temps across the state on Sunday will be quite cold with temps only warmning into the single digits, which will be nearly -15F to -20F below average. Wind chill values will be very cold across the northern half of the state, where some -20F to -30F readings will be possible in the morning.
 
____________________________________________________________________________

Weather Outlook From AM Sunday to AM Tuesday 

After a fairly active week last week, weather conditions will remain dry through the end of the weekend and into early next week. However, a storm system will move through the middle part of the country with areas of snow and ice.

 ________________________________________________________________________
 
Snow and Ice Across the Central US
 
Winter weather headilnes have been posted across parts of the Central US in advance of wintry precipitation that will be in the form of snow and ice. Several inches of snow and some icing will be possible from the Front Range of the Rockies to the Ohio Valley
 
___________________________________________________________________________
 
Extended Temperature Oulook
 
Here's the extended temperature outlook as we head through the last full week of December. Note that readings through early next week will still be quite chilly with highs still running well below average. It does appear that temps will continue to gradually warm by the end of the week and into the weekend ahead. It appears that temps will warm into the low/mid 30s by next weekend.
 
 
______________________________________________________________________
 
Extended Temperature Outlook
 
According to NOAA's CPC, the extended temperature outlook from December 22nd - 28th suggests temperatures will be running above average during that time frame. Note that the average high at MSP during that time frame is around 25F, while the average low is 10F. 
 
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 
Probability of a White Christmas
 
According to NOAA, the probability of a white Christmas in the Twin Cities is around 74%, or about 3 out of every 4 christmases has at least an inch of snow on the ground or more. Duluth, MN has a 92% probability of a white Christmas, while Sioux Falls, SD only has a 57% chance. Interestingly last year, the MSP Aiport only had a Trace of snow on the ground! Interestingly, there was 19" of snow on the ground on Christmas Day back in 2010, which was the 2nd greatest snow depth on Christmas Day behind 1983, when there was 20" on the ground.
 
 _________________________________________________________________________
 
Current Snow Depth
 
Here's the current snow depth across the nation, which shows a fairly hefty snow pack in the Mountains out west, including the Sierra Nevada Range. Parts of the Upper Midwest are also doing pretty good, including the Twin Cities metro, where 5" of snow was reported on the ground as of Tuesday. Interestingly, this is the most snow MSP has had on the ground during the month of December since 2016, when there was a maximum snow depth of 9" reported on the 17th that year. 
 
_____________________________________________________________________
 
Cold Sunday. Gradual Warming Through the Week.
By Todd Nelson, filling in for Douglas.

I am happy to report that we're less than 1 week away from the Winter Solstice, which arrives next Saturday at 10:19PM. At that moment, the sun's most direct rays will be shining over the Tropic of Capricorn at 23.5 degrees latitude south signifying the official start to winter in the northern hemisphere.

Interestingly, the midday sun is only 22 degrees high in the sky at this time of the year, but at the summer solstice, the sun's altitude is 68 degrees at high noon! We bottom out in terms of daylight next week with a total of 8 hour and 46 minutes at MSP. That is nearly 7 hours less daylight than our longest days of the year in mid June.

Extra layers will be needed out there today as high temps only warm into the single digits. Wind chill values will remain in the sub-zero range much of the day, making this one of the 3 coldest days of the season so far. Weather maps remain quiet through the week ahead with no major storms in sight.

Now, excuse me while I grab a gingerbread cookie... I've got another Hallmark movie to watch!
_____________________________________________

Extended Forecast

SUNDAY: Cold. Late PM flurries? Winds. SW 5-10. High: 10.

SUNDAY NIGHT: Mostly cloudy. A few flurries possible. Winds: S 5. Low: 1.

MONDAY: Clearing skies. Still nippy. Winds: WNW 5-10. High: 16.

TUESDAY: Quiet weather continues. Winds: NW 10-15. Wake-up: 2. High: 17.

WEDNESDAY: Mix of sun and clouds. Flakes up north? Winds: SSE 10-15. Wake-up: -3. High: 18.

THURSDAY: Clouds thicken. Light snow overnight. Winds: ENE 5-10. Wake-up: 15. High: 30.

FRIDAY: Cloudy with lingering flurries. Winds: NNW 5-10. Wake-up: 19. High: 26.

SATURDAY: Winter arrives 10:19PM. Winds: S 5-10. Wake-up: 15. High: 30.
______________________________________________________

This Day in Weather History
December 14th

1996: Snowfall exceeding one foot is reported from south central Minnesota through portions of the Twin Cities metropolitan area. Some of the higher snow totals include 15 inches at Rockford, 14 inches at Cedar and North Branch, 13 inches at Stewart and 7 to 10 inches across the central and southern parts of the Twin Cities metropolitan area.

1933: A severe ice storm hits southeast and central Minnesota.
_________________________________________________

Average High/Low for Minneapolis
December 14th

Average High: 27F (Record: 55F set in 1998)
Average Low: 12F (Record: -27F set in 1901)

Record Rainfall: 1.50" set in 1891
Record Snowfall: 5.2" set in 1996
_________________________________________________________

Sunrise/Sunset Times for Minneapolis
December 14th

Sunrise: 7:43am
Sunset: 4:32pm

Hours of Daylight: ~8 hours & 48 minutes

Daylight LOST since yesterday: ~ 37 seconds
Daylight LOST since summer solstice (June 21st): ~ 6 hours & 49 minutes
__________________________________________________________

Moon Phase for December 14th at Midnight
3.9 Days Before Last Quarter Moon

___________________________________

What's in the Night Sky?

"The annual Geminid meteor shower is expected to reach its peak this weekend – though under the glaring light of the almost-full waning gibbous moon. The peak morning is likely to be Saturday, December 14, 2019 – or, possibly, Sunday, December 15, 2019. But the morning of December 13 might offer some meteors, too. These colorful meteors tend to be bright, so you might see as many as 20 or so Perseids per hour, despite the moonlight. On a dark night, free of moonlight, you can easily spot 50 or more meteors per hour. Just know that – although this is one shower you can successfully watch in the (late) evening – the best viewing is typically around 2 a.m., no matter where you are on Earth. So the best time of night to watch for Geminid meteors is around 2 a.m., when the the shower’s radiant point – near the bright star Castor in the constellation Gemini – is high in the sky. If you’re not one to stay up late, you can watch for meteors during the evening hours. Although the meteors will be few and far between at early-to-mid evening, you might, if you’re lucky, catch an earthgrazer – a sloow-moving and loong-lasting meteor that travels horizontally across the sky. Can you watch the meteor shower online? Yes. It won’t be the same experience as being out under a dark country sky. But, especially if you’re clouded out and can’t get out of the city, watching online can be a good way to join the fun. So far, we’ve heard from only one organization planning to broadcast the Geminids live. It’s sky-live.tv, which will cover the live event with 3 cameras in Teide Observatory (Canary Islands), Olivenza (Extremadura) and High Energy Observatory HESS (Namibia)."

See more from Earth Sky HERE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

Sunday Weather Outlook

High temps on Sunday will be quite cold across much of the Upper Midwest with temps -10F to nearly -20F below average from St. Louis to Denver to Minneapolis. Meanwhile, temps from Dallas to Houston will be running nearly +15F to +20F above average.
 
________________________________________________________________________
 
Record Highs Possible Sunday
 
Here's a look at potential record highs across parts of central and southern Texas. It looks like highs will warm into the low/mid 80s near the Coastal Bend of Texas, which will be well above normal for mid December.
 

________________________________________________________________________
 
National Weather Outlook
 
Here's a look at weather conditions across the nation as we head through the rest of the weekend and into early next week. A storm system moving across the Rockies on Sunday will move out into the Central US early next week with widespread effects from snow and ice across the Central US to showers and storms across the Southern US. This storm system could be responsible for severe weather across parts of the Gulf Coast States on Monday with damaging winds and isolated tornadoes. 
 
______________________________________________________________________________
 
Heavy Ranifall Potential
 
The 7-day precipitation forecast from NOAA WPC, shows heavier precipitation across parts of the Gulf Coast States through the Ohio Valley. Another surge of heavier moisture looks like it will develop in the Pacific Northwest, where several inches of precipitation will be possible along the Coast and in the higher elevations of the Cascades.
 
_____________________________________________________________________________
 
"How to get your dog to brave bad weather and pee outside"
 
"Q: Cold weather is a problem for our small dog. We trained her to use a pee pad so she can stay inside on blustery days. When we leave the pad down, she shows no interest in going outside. If we remove the pad, she goes on rugs and mats in the house. How do we teach her to go outside, unless a pad is given to her?"

"A: Teaching a dog to relieve itself on a pad is usually quite simple. After a couple treats, the dog realizes that it can easily obtain relief."

"Teaching a dog to refrain from going elsewhere in the home is more difficult and often overlooked. Training falls apart when people assume that dogs will automatically comprehend that going anywhere in the home, other than on the pad, is incorrect. Dogs misinterpret this message frequently. Some dogs erroneously learn that they are allowed to go in a specific location. The pad fails to take on any meaning. For example, a family might put a mat in the bathroom, assuming the dog notices the significance of the pad. The dog might instead learn that they should go in the bathroom, and then end up going on the bath mat. Other dogs fail to differentiate between a square of adsorbent padding versus a square absorbent floor mat. To them, they are both very similar in appearance. Families, clearly know that these are different products, and that they serve different purposes. Dogs generally just see them as being very similar and thus interchangeable."

See more from The Star HERE:

___________________________________________________________________________

"Geminid Meteor Shower's Parent Debris Trail Spotted for 1st Time (Photo)"

"The Parker Solar Probe is making some non-sun discoveries as well. NASA's record-breaking Parker Solar Probe (PSP) has given us a new perspective on a famous meteor shower. In a cosmic first, PSP imaged the dusty trail of debris that causes the Geminid meteor shower, which peaks this weekend. Astronomers already knew that this stream was shed by the 3.7-mile-wide (6 kilometers) asteroid Phaethon, but they had never gotten a look at it before because it's so faint. PSP's Wide-Field Imager for Solar Probe (WISPR) instrument did, however, detecting a structure about 12 million miles long and 60,000 miles wide (20 million km by 100,000 km) that follows Phaethon's highly elliptical path around the sun, mission team members announced here today (Dec. 11) at the annual fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU)."

See more from Space.com HERE:

_________________________________________________________________________

"Incredible time-lapse shows the Earth being drained of water: NASA data shows how islands appear from the oceans before it all dries up"

"Nearly 70 percent of the Earth is covered with oceans, but an animation reveals what our planet would look like if they all disappeared. The clip simulated a drop in a range of sea levels that gradually reveals the two-thirds of land hidden underwater, with most of the area becoming visible at a decrease of 459 feet. The central area of the ocean begins to appear at depths of 6,500 feet and by 19,685 feet, all of the sea water has drained –except for parts of the Earth with deep sea trenches. The animation was created by James O'Donoghue, a scientist at the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, who remade ‘an animation NASA made back in 2008, but at high resolution and with edited timing.’ The timelapse lasts for 51 seconds and land begins to appear around the continents first, with the most becoming visible off the coast of Australia and Asia."

See more from Daily Mail HERE:

______________________________________________________________________________

Thanks for checking in and don't forget to follow me on Twitter @TNelsonWX

Weekend Cold Slap. No Major Storms in Sight

Saturday Weather Outlook
 
Oh boy... here we go again! Another blast of colder air will settle into the region this weekend with temps falling much of the day Saturday. Note that high temps will only warm into the lower teens and will likely occur early in the day. Wind chill values much of the day will be in the sub-zero range as wind gusts range from 10mph to 20mph.
 
______________________________________________________________________
 
Saturday Weather Outlook
 
High temps across the state on Saturday will be quite cold with readings falling through the day. Note that readings will be nearly -15F to -25F below average 
 
______________________________________________________________________
 
Weekend Outlook
 
It will definitely be a cold weekend with temps running well below average, especially on Sunday when we only warm into the single digits above zero. Wind chills through the weekend will likely stay in the single digits above and below zero, so bundle up! Monday looks a little better as we warm into the teens, but we'll still be quite a bit below average. The good news is that we don't have any major snow events coming up anytime soon.
 

____________________________________________________________________________
 

Weather Outlook From AM Saturday to PM Sunday

Here's the weather outlook from AM Saturday to PM Sunday, which shows fairly quiet weather close to home thanks to a cold bubble of high pressure moving through the region


________________________________________________________________________
Extended Temperature Oulook
 
Here's the extended temperature outlook as we head through the last full week of December. Note that readings on this weekend will be quite chilly with highs dipping into the single digits once again. Next week maybe a bit uncertain as the GFS suggests high temps staying well below average, while the European model suggests temps warming into the 20s and 30s... Stay tuned.
 

______________________________________________________________________
 
Extended Temperature Outlook
 
According to NOAA's CPC, the extended temperature outlook from December 20th - 26th suggests temperatures will be running above average during that time frame. Note that the average high at MSP during that time frame is around 25F, while the average low is 10F. 
 
 ___________________________________________________________________________
 
Probability of a White Christmas
 
According to NOAA, the probability of a white Christmas in the Twin Cities is around 74%, or about 3 out of every 4 christmases has at least an inch of snow on the ground or more. Duluth, MN has a 92% probability of a white Christmas, while Sioux Falls, SD only has a 57% chance. Interestingly last year, the MSP Aiport only had a Trace of snow on the ground! Interestingly, there was 19" of snow on the ground on Christmas Day back in 2010, which was the 2nd greatest snow depth on Christmas Day behind 1983, when there was 20" on the ground.
 
 _________________________________________________________________________
 
Current Snow Depth
 
Here's the current snow depth across the nation, which shows a fairly hefty snow pack in the Mountains out west, including the Sierra Nevada Range. Parts of the Upper Midwest are also doing pretty good, including the Twin Cities metro, where 5" of snow was reported on the ground as of Tuesday. Interestingly, this is the most snow MSP has had on the ground during the month of December since 2016, when there was a maximum snow depth of 9" reported on the 17th that year. 
 
_____________________________________________________________________
 
Weekend Cold Slap. No Major Storms in Sight
By Todd Nelson, filling in for Douglas.

Given the wintry assault we endured last week, I'm tempted to keep the lights off & stay under the covers all weekend. I've had enough shoveling and icy roads for now. Plus, I still need to unthaw the 2 inch long icicle hanging from my face.

Believe it or not, we've actually had pretty typical December weather so far. MSP is near average snowfall through the first 13 days of the month and temperatures are only running about 1 degree below average. Ice anglers are happy that we're still making ice on lakes across the state and winter sports enthusiasts are happy that we finally have snow on the ground during the month of December! Hey, I'm a hockey guy. I grew up playing pick-up games on frozen winter ponds; I can't believe I still have all of my teeth!

The snow and cold isn't all that bad. In fact, most Minnesotans thrive in this climate. Along with our 10,000 lakes, it's our claim to fame, right?

With that said, icy wind chills return this weekend. However, there are no plowable storms in sight through next week. Have a great weekend.
_____________________________________________

Extended Forecast

SATURDAY: Cold slap, falling temps. Feel like -5F by 12PM. Winds: NW 10-15. High: 13 and falling.

SATURDAY NIGHT: Partly cloudy and cold. Winds: NW 5. Low: -6.

SUNDAY: Icy sunshine. Sub-zero wind chills. Winds. SW 5-10. High: 7.

MONDAY: Partly sunny. Below average temps. Winds: WSW 5-10. Wake-up: 0. High: 16.

TUESDAY: Lingering AM flurries. Cold winds return. Winds: NW 10-20. Wake-up: 1. High: 15.

WEDNESDAY: Mix of sun and clouds. A touch warmer. Winds: SSW 10-15. Wake-up: -4. High: 20.

THURSDAY: Nothing rough. Still making ice. Winds: N 5. Wake-up: 14. High: 25.

FRIDAY: Clouds thicken. Light snow late. Winds: NNE 5. Wake-up: 14. High: 27.
______________________________________________________

This Day in Weather History
December 14th

1996: Snowfall exceeding one foot is reported from south central Minnesota through portions of the Twin Cities metropolitan area. Some of the higher snow totals include 15 inches at Rockford, 14 inches at Cedar and North Branch, 13 inches at Stewart and 7 to 10 inches across the central and southern parts of the Twin Cities metropolitan area.

1933: A severe ice storm hits southeast and central Minnesota.
_________________________________________________

Average High/Low for Minneapolis
December 14th

Average High: 27F (Record: 55F set in 1998)
Average Low: 12F (Record: -27F set in 1901)

Record Rainfall: 1.50" set in 1891
Record Snowfall: 5.2" set in 1996
_________________________________________________________

Sunrise/Sunset Times for Minneapolis
December 14th

Sunrise: 7:43am
Sunset: 4:32pm

Hours of Daylight: ~8 hours & 48 minutes

Daylight LOST since yesterday: ~ 37 seconds
Daylight LOST since summer solstice (June 21st): ~ 6 hours & 49 minutes
__________________________________________________________

Moon Phase for December 14th at Midnight
3.9 Days Before Last Quarter Moon

___________________________________

What's in the Night Sky?

"The annual Geminid meteor shower is expected to reach its peak this weekend – though under the glaring light of the almost-full waning gibbous moon. The peak morning is likely to be Saturday, December 14, 2019 – or, possibly, Sunday, December 15, 2019. But the morning of December 13 might offer some meteors, too. These colorful meteors tend to be bright, so you might see as many as 20 or so Perseids per hour, despite the moonlight. On a dark night, free of moonlight, you can easily spot 50 or more meteors per hour. Just know that – although this is one shower you can successfully watch in the (late) evening – the best viewing is typically around 2 a.m., no matter where you are on Earth. So the best time of night to watch for Geminid meteors is around 2 a.m., when the the shower’s radiant point – near the bright star Castor in the constellation Gemini – is high in the sky. If you’re not one to stay up late, you can watch for meteors during the evening hours. Although the meteors will be few and far between at early-to-mid evening, you might, if you’re lucky, catch an earthgrazer – a sloow-moving and loong-lasting meteor that travels horizontally across the sky. Can you watch the meteor shower online? Yes. It won’t be the same experience as being out under a dark country sky. But, especially if you’re clouded out and can’t get out of the city, watching online can be a good way to join the fun. So far, we’ve heard from only one organization planning to broadcast the Geminids live. It’s sky-live.tv, which will cover the live event with 3 cameras in Teide Observatory (Canary Islands), Olivenza (Extremadura) and High Energy Observatory HESS (Namibia)."

See more from Earth Sky HERE:

_______________________________________________________________________________

Saturday Weather Outlook

High temps on Saturday will be colder once again across the Upper Midwest with temps falling through the day to well below average levels. However, temps in the Eastern and Southern US will be running above average by nearly +5F to +15F. 
 
________________________________________________________________________
 
National Weather Outlook
 
Here's a look at weather conditions across the nation as we head into the weekend. Note that weather conditions in the Eastern US will continue to be very active as a storm system lifts northeast with areas of heavy rain, snow and even gusty winds. Some locations could see 1" to 2"+ inches of rain, which could lead to localized flood concerns. Areas of snow will develop as the storm pulls down cooler air from Canada Saturday night into Sunday. Snow accumulations can't be ruled out, some of which could be plowable across the Eastern Great Lakes. There will also be gusty winds in the Northeast later this weekend. Meanwhile, active weather continues in the Western US with areas of rain and heavier mountain snow. This storm will move into the Plains this weekend with the potential of wintry precipitation and eventually showers and storms by Sunday.
 

______________________________________________________________________________
 
Heavy Ranifall Potential
 
The 7-day precipitation forecast from NOAA WPC, shows heavier precipitation continuing in the Mid-Atlantic and into the Northeast through the early half of the weekend. Meanwhile, areas of heavy precipitation will continue in the Western US, with some of the heaviest precipitation in the higher elevations.
 
__________________________________________________________________________
 
Heavier Precipitation Continues in the Eastern US
 
Areas of heavy precipitation will continues in the Eastern US with some 1" to 2"+ tallies possible from parts of the Mid-Atlantic States to the Northeast through Saturday. Some of the heavy rainfall could lead to localized areas of flooding, especially in the Northeast, where Flood Watches have been issued from near Boston, MA to Coastal Maine through PM Saturday. As colder air pours in on the backside of the storm, snow will develop Saturday into Sunday. Accumulating snow will be possible for some, which could be enough to shovel and plow closer to the Eastern Great Lakes.
 
 
_____________________________________________________________________________
 
Pacific Moisture Spreads East
 
Pacific moisture will continue to spread east throughout the region with areas of rain in the lower elevations and heavy snow in the mountains. Note that the heaviest precipitation is starting to shift a little farther south and east, but much of the Northwest will still get in on some rain/snow through the early weekend.
 
__________________________________________________________________________
 
Heavy Snow in the High Elevations
 
Precipitation will continue to spread south and east through the upcoming weekend with some of the heaviest tallies likely in the higher elevations. Note that heaviest precipitation will coincide with heavy snow potential in the Sierra Nevadas, The Wasatch Range and into the Colorado Rockies, where 1ft. to 2ft. of snow (or more) can't be ruled out.
 
 

__________________________________________________________________________
 
"How to get your dog to brave bad weather and pee outside"
 
"Q: Cold weather is a problem for our small dog. We trained her to use a pee pad so she can stay inside on blustery days. When we leave the pad down, she shows no interest in going outside. If we remove the pad, she goes on rugs and mats in the house. How do we teach her to go outside, unless a pad is given to her?"

"A: Teaching a dog to relieve itself on a pad is usually quite simple. After a couple treats, the dog realizes that it can easily obtain relief."

"Teaching a dog to refrain from going elsewhere in the home is more difficult and often overlooked. Training falls apart when people assume that dogs will automatically comprehend that going anywhere in the home, other than on the pad, is incorrect. Dogs misinterpret this message frequently. Some dogs erroneously learn that they are allowed to go in a specific location. The pad fails to take on any meaning. For example, a family might put a mat in the bathroom, assuming the dog notices the significance of the pad. The dog might instead learn that they should go in the bathroom, and then end up going on the bath mat. Other dogs fail to differentiate between a square of adsorbent padding versus a square absorbent floor mat. To them, they are both very similar in appearance. Families, clearly know that these are different products, and that they serve different purposes. Dogs generally just see them as being very similar and thus interchangeable."

See more from The Star HERE:


___________________________________________________________________________

"Geminid Meteor Shower's Parent Debris Trail Spotted for 1st Time (Photo)"

"The Parker Solar Probe is making some non-sun discoveries as well. NASA's record-breaking Parker Solar Probe (PSP) has given us a new perspective on a famous meteor shower. In a cosmic first, PSP imaged the dusty trail of debris that causes the Geminid meteor shower, which peaks this weekend. Astronomers already knew that this stream was shed by the 3.7-mile-wide (6 kilometers) asteroid Phaethon, but they had never gotten a look at it before because it's so faint. PSP's Wide-Field Imager for Solar Probe (WISPR) instrument did, however, detecting a structure about 12 million miles long and 60,000 miles wide (20 million km by 100,000 km) that follows Phaethon's highly elliptical path around the sun, mission team members announced here today (Dec. 11) at the annual fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU)."

See more from Space.com HERE:


_________________________________________________________________________

"Incredible time-lapse shows the Earth being drained of water: NASA data shows how islands appear from the oceans before it all dries up"

"Nearly 70 percent of the Earth is covered with oceans, but an animation reveals what our planet would look like if they all disappeared. The clip simulated a drop in a range of sea levels that gradually reveals the two-thirds of land hidden underwater, with most of the area becoming visible at a decrease of 459 feet. The central area of the ocean begins to appear at depths of 6,500 feet and by 19,685 feet, all of the sea water has drained –except for parts of the Earth with deep sea trenches. The animation was created by James O'Donoghue, a scientist at the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, who remade ‘an animation NASA made back in 2008, but at high resolution and with edited timing.’ The timelapse lasts for 51 seconds and land begins to appear around the continents first, with the most becoming visible off the coast of Australia and Asia."

See more from Daily Mail HERE:


____________________________________________________________________________
"This Timelapse of Earth's Glaciers Will Change Your Perspective of The Past 50 Years"
 
"New timelapse videos from satellites that have been monitoring Earth for decades have revealed the shocking reality of ice melting at accelerated speeds all over our planet. The series focuses on glaciers and ice sheets in Alaska, Greenland and Antarctica, showing how, over the decades, most of the ice is retreating annually and not growing back. "I think observational glaciology in terms of remote sensing is a very data-rich field now, compared to 1972, when you had a few images," says glaciologist Mark Fahnestock of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. "So we are beginning to get a historical record of the speeds of glaciers, and so we can watch how rapidly that surface is lowering as things speed up, or where it's thickening."
 
 

____________________________________________________________________________
 
"Drought, Heat, and Victoria Falls: A Climate Story with a Twist"
 
"The massive curtain of water in southern Africa between Zambia and Zimbabwe known as Victoria Falls is the world’s biggest waterfall sequence when you take into account both width and height. Often ranked as one of the seven wonders of the natural world, the falls are a prime tourist destination, which explains much of the horrified reaction the last few days as news spread that the falls had dried to a virtual trickle. Much of the coverage has centered on claims that the region is experiencing its worst drought in a century. The Zambezi River Basin that surrounds and nurtures the falls is a drought-prone place, a semiarid region accustomed to big year-to-year variations in rainfall. It’s typical for the falls to become starkly depleted in October and November, just before the onset of the summer wet season. Pictures of the falls as a raging torrent are more likely taken in March or April."
 
 

__________________________________________________________________________
 
"GPS app Waze rolls out new 'Snow Warning' feature that notifies drivers when roads are hazardous because of winter weather"
 
"Winter is just around the corner for parts of the world and Waze has added a new feature to keep those living in these areas safe while on the road. The app now offers ‘Snow Warnings’ for drivers approaching streets that are potentially hazardous due to inclement weather. Users can report, in real-time, when a road has not been plowed and stay informed when the approach an area that has been identified by other drivers as unplowed. The feature will offer the Waze community of over 130 million monthly users the opportunity to be better prepared for winter weather conditions, as reported on by 9to5Google. Waze teamed with the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) for the new feature. VDOT presented the now offers ‘Snow Warnings’ for drivers approaching streets that are potentially hazardous due to inclement weather idea to the Waze ahead of the winter season in order to keep drivers better informed while on the road. And app allows users to report a range of weather included 'ice on road', 'flood' 'hail' and 'fog', so others can see what lays ahead of them. Dani Simons, Head of Public Sector Partnerships at Waze, said: ‘One of the primary reasons we created the Waze for Cities Data program was to provide public agencies with data and insights to reduce traffic and improve the safety of their roadways."
 
 

______________________________________________________________________________

Thanks for checking in and don't forget to follow me on Twitter @TNelsonWX