Reporter Rochelle Olson updates you on the construction of the new Minnesota Vikings stadium in downtown Minneapolis.

Glass frames going in today, glass next week at Vikings stadium

Posted by: Rochelle Olson under Super Bowl, Vikings fans Updated: March 18, 2015 - 3:47 PM

The first sheets of glass are on-site and ready to go up on the Minnesota Vikings stadium.

On Wednesday, crews were installing the aluminum framework that will house the glass, making way for the first panes to go up next week.

Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority Chairwoman Michele Kelm-Helgen said she could see the glass panes from her window ready for installation.

Eventually, the project will be a $1 billion soaring glass structure. The bolting on of the glass is yet another sign of the swift progression on the building funded by the Vikings, state and city taxpayers.

Each glass sheet is 5 feet by 9 feet and some 10,000 sheets will form the exterior skin of the stadium. The glass began rolling off the manufacturing lines at Viracon's Owatonna facility last month.

A 30-person crew from Plymouth-based InterClad will bolt the glass onto the stadium. The first panes will be put up on the 11th Avenue side of the stadium.

The glass will be transparent, not the bird-safe etched product that waterfowl advocates sought. Maplewood-based 3M is still researching a transparent film that might be applied to the glass after construction, Kelm-Helgen said Wednesday.

Bird protesters have regularly attended meetings of the MSFA to plead for bird-safe glass on the building. The advocates say the building could become a death-trap during the migration season.

But the MSFA and Vikings say the stadium's design aims to be transparent and provide an outdoor-feel in the enclosed space.The structure is expected to be fully enclosed by November and is set to open in July 2016.

Viracon, whose parent company is Bloomington-based Apogee Enterprises Inc., made the glass used on One World Trade Center. The company built its reputation on the mirrored, colored and energy-efficient glass covering skyscrapers, the University of Minnesota’s TCF Bank Stadium and the San Francisco 49ers’ stadium.

The new Vikings stadium will have seven interior levels and two full-circle concourses with views of the field.

The site will play host to the 2018 Super Bowl. The next MSFA meeting is set for March 27.

First sheet of glass ready to go up on new Vikings stadium

Posted by: Rochelle Olson under Super Bowl, Vikings fans Updated: March 18, 2015 - 1:15 PM

The first sheet of glass is on-site and ready to go up on the Minnesota Vikings stadium.

Eventually, the project will be a $1 billion soaring glass structure. The bolting on of the glass is yet another sign of the swift progression on the building funded by the Vikings, state and city taxpayers.

Each glass sheet is 5 feet by 9 feet and some 10,000 sheets will form the exterior skin of the stadium. The glass started rolling off the manufacturing lines at Viracon's Owatonna facility last month.

A 30-person crew from Plymouth-based InterClad will bolt the glass onto the stadium. The first panes are going up on the 11th Street side of the stadium.

The glass will be transparent, not the bird-safe etched product that waterfowl advocates sought.  Maplewood-based 3M is still researching a transparent film that might be applied to the glass after construction, according to Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority (MSFA) chairwoman Michele Kelm-Helgen on Wednesday.

Bird protesters have regularly attended meetings of the MSFA to plead for bird-safe glass on the building. The advocates say the building could become a death-trap during the migration season.

But the MSFA and Vikings say the stadium's design aims to be transparent and provide an outdoor-feel in the enclosed space.The structure is expected to be fully enclosed by November and is set to open in July 2016.

Viracon, whose parent company is Bloomington-based Apogee Enterprises Inc., made the glass used on One World Trade Center. The company built its reputation on the mirrored, colored and energy-efficient glass covering skyscrapers, the University of Minnesota’s TCF Bank Stadium and the San Francisco 49ers’ stadium.

The new Vikings stadium will have seven interior levels and two full-circle concourses with views of the field.

The site will play host to the 2018 Super Bowl. The next MSFA meeting is set for March 27.

Atlanta PSLs cost lots more than those for new Vikings' stadium

Posted by: Rochelle Olson Updated: January 8, 2015 - 3:12 PM

The NFL's Atlanta Falcons will begin selling one-time personal-seat licenses (PSL) next week to finance their under-construction new stadium.

Prices were set for the most expensive club seats on Thursday. The one-time seat-license fee ranges from $10,000 to $45,000 for all-inclusive premium seats. At the new Vikings' stadium, team owners are selling stadium-builder licenses at prices from $500 to $9,500.

At both stadiums, the license buyers must then purchase season tickets to attend games. The Falcons' PSLs come with a three-year price lock on season tickets for 2017, 2018 and 2019.

“We expect the entire club seat sales process to take approximately five months, after which we will begin the PSL and seat sales process for the remainder of the building," said Michael Drake, vice president of sales and service for Legends Global Sales, which oversees sales for the new Atlanta stadium. "Our plans call for a wide range of prices to ensure affordable access for all fans.”

Vikings' owners Zygi and Mark Wilf aim to raise $125 million of their cost to build the $1.1 billion NFL stadium in Minneapolis.

Vikings' spokesman Jeff Anderson notes that 25 percent of the seats in the new Minnesota Vikings' stadium don't require purchase of a seat license, including the corporate suites.

The new Vikings stadium will seat 64,000 people and is scheduled to open in July 2016.

Vikings reportedly increasing stadium contribution Friday

Posted by: Rochelle Olson Updated: October 9, 2014 - 5:03 PM

The Minnesota Vikings supposedly are going to announce plans Friday to pay for more stuff at the new $1 billion "People's" stadium, but nobody was willing to say what it was Thursday.

The Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority's (MSFA) agenda for Friday said the body will "approve project budget amendments" at the regularly scheduled meeting. The chair of the MSFA is Michele Kelm-Helgen, the governor's appointee to the board.

 Asked for detail about the agenda, MSFA spokeswoman Jenn Hathaway said the item involves "additional items the team is funding." When asked what those are and what they cost, she said she didn't know what the items are.

The Vikings provided no additional information.

Spokesman Jeff Anderson gave a 9-word answer: "We are scheduled to talk about it tomorrow. Thanks." 

For a public body, the MSFA provides extremely sparse agendas.

Most governmental bodies provide more explanation, sometimes pages and pages of documents. That's in contrast to the MSFA agenda line of four words to explain a price increase.

The point of putting out an agenda is to give the public notice and information about what will be discussed at a meeting involving a public body making decisions about public money. Roughly half the cost of the $1 billion new stadium is being covered by the public.

In contrast, the Minnesota Ballpark Authority that runs Target Field, makes an effort to provide a full explanation of agenda items at least two days in advance of a meeting.

Similarly, Minneapolis, St. Paul, Ramsey and Hennepin counties hyperlink to documents on their online agendas.

State law requires supporting documentation available when public bodies vote.

Coalition gathering strength to oppose Redskins at Gophers' stadium

Posted by: Rochelle Olson Updated: August 28, 2014 - 12:42 PM

The Washington Redskins shouldn't be allowed to use their offensive team name while playing on the Minnesota Vikings on the University of Minnesota campus Nov. 2, according to a coalition vowing a strong fight against the use of the word or mascot.

Led by prominent American Indian leaders, a group stood outside TCF Bank Stadium on Thursday morning to call on the university to ban the team's name. The group also said it is considering a lawsuit because it considers the use of the name in a public facility to be illegal.

The group says the word Redskins is highly offensive, dating back to how blood would run down an Indian's body after he had been scalped.

David Glass says the Indian group wants the word banned at the stadium. It also wants fans to be barred from wearing "any kind of denigrating face paint" or head wear. The group doesn't want Redskins memorabilia to be sold in the park or have the team name used by announcers during the game.

The Vikings are playing at the stadium for two seasons while their new $1 billion facility is built on the site of the former Metrodome.

The Redskins come to town Nov. 2. The protesters say they will have thousands at the game objecting to the use of the name and they want to be able to roam freely on the stadium grounds not be "penned up" in a confined area.

Glass said the group is hoping their news conference would spur the university to take action to ban the word.

Spike Moss, a longtime Minneapolis activist, said the term is akin to having a football team called the "Little Black Sambos" or the n-word.

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