Here are three things you should know about Trisha Yearwood, the country singer-turned-Food Network star:

  1. For her, breakfast is simply coffee. “I have to wake up for a while and I’ll eat something later.”
  2. Her TV series, “Trisha’s Kitchen,” is actually filmed at her house in Nashville – the one she lived in before marrying Garth Brooks. She converted her garage into a second kitchen so they can shoot the show more efficently.
  3. Her latest endeavor, Trisha’s Tailgate, will take place at 3 p.m. Saturday at Downtown Plaza East before Garth’s second show at U.S. Bank Stadium.

“People are tailgating all afternoon in the parking lot,” Yearwood said this week from Nashville. “So what if we provided this really cool tent, give ‘em really good food, games to play, drinks, shelter and they have a place to be for a few hours before the show 'cause they’re going to be there anyway.”

Yearwood admits that she’s “out of my comfort zone” but enjoying her “mini-food festival.”

All the recipes are Yearwood’s. She doesn’t do the cooking but has her culinary expert assure quality control.

It gives her a way to translate some recipes into bite-size apps. “I feel there’s a cookbook in there somewhere,” she mused.

Yearwood spends about an hour in the tent. She does a food demonstration and a Q&A.  She doesn’t pose for selfies or sign autographs. There are too many people.

“The world Garth and I come from, if you can’t sign 1,500 autographs, you can’t sign one. You don’t want to disappoint anybody.”

So instead there’s a “Trisha mascot,” (her words) who mingles with the crowd and poses for selfies.

For $65, tailgaters get unlimited food, two drinks and a chance to hang for three hours.

Yearwood may sing with Garth at the Vikings stadium. He often invites her for a few numbers in the middle of the show.

Meanwhile, she released an album of Frank Sinatra songs, “Let’s Be Frank,” in December and will drop a new country album in the fall, her first since 2007, with a tour to follow.

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