End of Windows XP support spells trouble

  • Article by: BREE FOWLER , Associated Press
  • Updated: April 9, 2014 - 8:57 AM

Many computers still use the system, but Microsoft is ending security updates.

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In this October 2001 photo, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates promoted the new Windows XP operating system.

Photo: Associated Press file,

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– Microsoft will end support for the persistently popular Windows XP on Tuesday, and the move could put everything from the operations of heavy industry to the identities of everyday people in danger.

An estimated 30 percent of computers being used by businesses and consumers around the world are still running the 12-year-old operating system.

“What once was considered low-hanging fruit by hackers now has a big neon bull’s-eye on it,” says Patrick Thomas, a security consultant at the San Jose, Calif.-based firm Neohapsis.

Microsoft has released a handful of Windows operating systems since 2001, but XP’s popularity and the durability of the computers it was installed on kept it around longer than expected. Analysts say that if a PC is more than five years old, chances are it’s running XP.

While users can still run XP after Tuesday, Microsoft says it will no longer provide security updates, issue fixes to nonsecurity related problems or offer online technical content updates. The company is discontinuing XP to focus on maintaining its newer operating systems, the core programs that run personal computers.

The Redmond, Wash.-based company says it will provide anti-malware-related updates through July 14, 2015, but warns that the tweaks could be of limited help on an outdated operating system.

Most industry experts say they recognize that the time for Microsoft to end support for such a dated system has come, but the move poses both security and operational risks for the remaining users. In addition to home computers, XP is used to run everything from water treatment facilities and power plants to small businesses like doctor’s offices.

Thomas says XP appealed to a wide variety of people and businesses that saw it as a workhorse and many chose to stick with it instead of upgrading to Windows Vista, Windows 7 or 8.

 

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