Gov. Mark Dayton on Saturday asked the family of an unarmed black man shot and killed by Minneapolis police officers to meet with federal attorneys headed to Minnesota on Sunday.

Dayton made the request after a meeting Saturday with members of Jamar Clark’s family and Black Lives Matter, as well as Rep. Keith Ellison.

They were joined via telephone by Assistant U.S. Attorney General Vania Gupta, who leads the U.S. Justice Department’s civil rights division, and Anthony Newby of the group Neighborhoods Organizing for Change.

Dayton urged the family, Black Lives Matter and the attorneys to discuss the tapes now in the possession of the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, which is investigating Clark’s death.

“I will urge that the tapes be provided to the family and released to the public, as soon as doing so will not jeopardize the Department of Justice’s investigation,” Dayton said.

The governor also plans to ask for a federal investigation of “any matters which occurred in Minneapolis during the past week that may have violated the civil rights of any Minnesota citizens.” He also will meet with Black Lives Matter Minneapolis and Neighborhoods Organizing for Change in December.

The governor also plans to ask for a federal investigation of “any matters which occurred in Minneapolis during the past week that may have violated the civil rights of any Minnesota citizens.” He also will meet with Black Lives Matter Minneapolis and Neighborhoods Organizing for Change in December.

Minneapolis officials responded in a flurry of statements late Saturday: 

City Council President Barb Johnson, who represents part of north Minneapolis, said that any investigation would show "not only that our officers have done a great job, but that it will show criminal behavior on the part of some protesters."

In a posting on Facebook, Council Member Blong Yang, whose district also is in north Minneapolis, expressed frustration and said "I can't agree to the [Black Lives Matter] demands. They keep growing and/or changing, and many are not permitted by current law."  

Police Chief Janeé Harteau also applauded the work of her officers, saying an investgation “will only confirm the strength” of officers’ work to protect public safety and freedom of speech.

Mayor Betsy Hodges gave credit to police and protesters, asking both "to continue to exercise restraint and respect." She added that officers "continue to do their best to protect neighbors and protesters from violent elements who are out only to do harm."

Also Saturday, demonstrators maintained an encampment outside the Minneapolis police’s Fourth Precinct station, marking a full week of protests over Clark’s shooting death.

On the heels of a candlelight vigil that drew hundreds, union leaders held a rally Saturday afternoon outside the police station to show solidarity with Black Lives Matter.

One speaker, Kyle Edwards of AFSCME Local 3800, representing University of Minnesota clerical workers, said working-class people are becoming aware that “we’re all in this together.”

Earlier Saturday, around 5 a.m., police erected concrete barriers on Morgan Avenue N. to block off the station’s side entrance, where protesters have congregated throughout the week. A live stream from alternative news outlet Unicorn Riot shows activists linking arms in a line to prevent police from entering the camp.

Police made no attempt to clear the area, spokesman John Elder said.

Graffiti laced with anti-police profanity was removed from the precinct’s walls about 10:30 a.m., he said. A few protesters were asked to move their tents while painters worked, but they returned immediately after.

Two people were arrested on charges of felony destruction of property Thursday after spraying paint over a security camera on the precinct’s front wall. Chalk messages on the building also have been removed.

Staff writer Liz Sawyer contributed to this report.