Hundreds of Twin Cities towed vehicles add to winter storm's misery

  • Article by: PAUL WALSH , Star Tribune
  • Updated: February 11, 2013 - 9:10 PM

The Twin Cities, however, didn't bear the brunt as the deepest snow fell to the west and north.

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Despite the snow and ice storm Sunday the Monday morning commute on eastbound I-94 from Minneapolis to St. Paul was fairly routine.

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Sunday and Monday's wintry mix of snow, sleet, rain and wind was kinder to Twin Cities residents than to their fellow Minnesotans far and wide, although Minneapolis and St. Paul motorists who had their vehicles towed amid snow emergencies might think otherwise.

In Minneapolis, 343 vehicles were towed on Sunday and another 497 were towed by 4 p.m. Monday, said city spokesman Matt Laible. Tuesday is the last day of the current snow emergency in Minneapolis.

In St. Paul, between 9 p.m. Sunday, when the city's snow emergency began, and 6:30 a.m. Monday, 1,970 cars were ticketed for not being moved off appropriate streets. Of those, 566 were eventually towed, said Public Works spokesman Dave Hunt. Numbers after 6:30 a.m. Monday were not immediately available.

St. Paul's snow emergency is over, but street plowing will continue until roads are clear. Ticketing and towing will continue until Thursday night. Drivers still should avoid parking in spots where the snow has not been completely plowed to the curb, Hunt said.

Beyond the Twin Cities, roads were temporarily closed in some hard-hit areas, and dozens of schools either extended the weekend by a day for students or by at least two hours. Schools closed Monday included Bemidji, Grand Rapids and Little Falls.

Among the cities with the deepest snowfall measurements were Carlos in Douglas County with 13 inches, Walker 11 and Hillman 10. Willmar had nearly 8 inches and Two Harbors about 6 inches, according to the National Weather Service.

In the metro area, Forest Lake had 4 inches of snow, Edina and Maplewood about 3 inches, and Burnsville about 2.5.

In the Twin Cities, for the next couple of days, highs are forecast to be in the upper 20s to low 30s, with little chance of precipitation until late Wednesday, forecasters say.

At that point, we may see flurries, sleet or freezing rain.

Staff writer Chao Xiong contributed to this report. Paul Walsh • 612-673-4482

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