This blog covers everything except sports and gardening, unless we find a really good link about using dead professional bowlers for mulch. The author is a StarTribune columnist, has been passing off fiction and hyperbole as insight since 1997, has run his own website since the Jurassic era of AOL, and was online when today’s college sophomores were a year away from being born. So get off his lawn.

Mickey Mouse is French Now

Posted by: James Lileks under Praise Updated: March 13, 2013 - 12:22 PM

Mais oui. Perhaps you've seen it already, or perhaps you've been busy doing productive things that contribute to the economy, and you don't have time for childish things that grown people shouldn't really care about after they're 12.  That would be a narrow view of things. Cartoons aren't always for adults, but the best ones are for everyone.

Is this one of those? It's the first in a series of Mickey Mouse cartoons,  and it “reimagines” Mickey in a looser, more abstract style.

 


Croissant de Triomphe on Disney Video

 

I . . . I don’t know. I’m split. It’ll work fine for kids; it’ll infuriate some purists because that is or is notsomething Mickey would do, and he shouldn’t be French, and there are several key violation of cartoon physics, and so on. But it’s short and fun, and there are many more to come. If there’s one thing that bugged me, it’s the scene where he jumps off Notre Dame, and we see it from three angle in slo-mo with the “Six-Million Dollar Man” sound playing faintly in the background. This was funny for a while when Dexter’s Laboratory did it. 

Speaking of which!

Disney Animation has teamed with Paul Rudish (Dexter’s Laboratory, The Powerpuff Girls) to give the mouse a new modernized look.

That explains it. Disney’s D23 site says:

Produced in 2D animation, the design esthetic for the Mickey Mouse cartoon shorts reaches back almost 80 years and borrows reverentially from the bold style of his 1930s design, but not before adding a few contemporary touches. Designs for other characters have a similar approach, favoring a “rubber-hose” cartoon style for more exaggerated animation. Background designs closely reflect the graphic design sense of 1950s and 1960s Disney cartoons. And for those true eagle-eyed Disney fans, the production team has also included the occasional homage to other icons from the storied Disney heritage.

That’s absolutely right. Thirties-inspired character design and stylized watercolor backgrounds.

I'd love to give examples and break it all down, but the blog software is not allowing images today, so there's no point in attempting to post the entry I worked on for two hours. Sorry. Hope it's fixed  tomorrow.

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