Laurie Hertzel is senior editor for books at the Star Tribune, where she has worked since 1996. She is the author of "News to Me: Adventures of an Accidental Journalist," winner of a Minnesota Book Award.

Posts about Book awards

Graphic book on long list for National Book Award

Posted by: Laurie Hertzel Updated: September 17, 2014 - 7:10 AM

The National Book Award long list for nonfiction was released this morning. Included on the list are a history of Paris during the time of the Nazis, a biography of Tennessee Williams, and a graphic memoir by New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast.

The short list will be announced in October, and the winner announced in November.

Long lists for poetry and young people's literature were announced earlier this week. Tomorrow the fourth long-list, for fiction, will be announced.

Here are the nonfiction nominees:

Roz Chast, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? (Bloomsbury)

John Demos, The Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic
(Alfred A. Knopf/ Random House)

Anand Gopal, No Good Men Among the Living: America, the Taliban, and the War through Afghan Eyes
(Metropolitan Books/ Henry Holt and Company)

Nigel Hamilton, The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941 - 1942 (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Walter Isaacson, The Innovators: How a Group of Inventors, Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution (Simon & Schuster)

John Lahr, Tennessee Williams: Mad Pilgrimage of the Flesh (W.W. Norton & Company)

Evan Osnos, Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China
(Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

Ronald C. Rosbottom, When Paris Went Dark: The City of Light Under German Occupation, 1940-1944 
(Little, Brown and Company/ Hachette Book Group)

Matthew Stewart, Nature's God: The Heretical Origins of the American Republic (W.W. Norton & Company)

Edward O. Wilson, The Meaning of Human Existence (Liveright Publishing Corporation/ W.W. Norton & Company)

Two Graywolf Press books on longlist for National Book Award

Posted by: Laurie Hertzel Updated: September 16, 2014 - 8:27 AM

Two books published by Minneapolis' Graywolf Press are on the longlist for the National Book Award for poetry. The short list will be announced Oct. 15 and the winner announced in November.

Last year's winner, "Incarnadine," by Mary Szybist, was published by Graywolf.

Here's the list:

Louise Glück, ‘Faithful and Virtuous Night,’ Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Edward Hirsch, ‘Gabriel: A Poem,’ Alfred A. Knopf

Fanny Howe, ‘Second Childhood,’ Graywolf Press

Maureen N. McLane, ‘This Blue,’ Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Brian Blanchfield, ‘A Several World,’ Nightboat Books

Fred Moten, ‘The Feel Trio,’ Letter Machine Editions

Claudia Rankine, ‘Citizen: An American Lyric,’ Graywolf Press

Spencer Reece, ‘The Road to Emmaus,’ Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Mark Strand, ‘Collected Poems,’ Alfred A. Knopf

Two Americans make the Man Booker short list

Posted by: Laurie Hertzel Updated: September 9, 2014 - 10:41 AM

No David Mitchell on the Man Booker short list, which was something of a surprise; his new novel, "The Bone Clocks," had been pegged as a likely winner.

And no Siri Hustvedt; she, too, did not make the cut from the long list

But any fears the Brits had that the American writers were going to take over their award are unfounded; just two American writers--Joshua Ferris, and Karen Joy Fowler--are among the six finalists.

Here's the list. The winner will be announced Oct. 14, and the prize of 50,000 pounds is equal to about $85,000.

"To Rise Again at a Decent Hour," by Joshua Ferris. (Our review runs Sept. 21.)

"J," by Howard Jacobson. Jacobson won the Man Booker Prize in 2010 for "The Finkler Question."

 "We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves," by Karen Joy Fowler. Her novel, published in the United States in 2013, won the PEN/Faulkner Award.

"The Narrow Road to the Deep North," by Australian writer Richard Flanagan, is now the odds-on favorite to win.

"The Lives of Others," by Neel Mukherjee

"How to Be Both," by Ali Smith.

Louise Erdrich wins PEN/Saul Bellow Award for fiction

Posted by: Laurie Hertzel Updated: September 9, 2014 - 10:03 AM
Louise Erdrich

Louise Erdrich

Louise Erdrich's "awesome" breadth of work has earned her the PEN/Saul Bellow Award, it was announced today. The award is a lifetime achievement honor and carries with it a $25,000 prize and is presented every two years.

In their citation, judges Zadie Smith, E.L. Doctorow and Edwidge Danticat praised Erdrich's range.

"Some writers work a small piece of land: Louise Erdrich is not one of those writers," they said. "Her work has an awesome capaciousness--each person is a world. For Erdrich, the tale of the individual necessarily leads to the tale of the family, and families lead to nations, while the wound of a national injustice is passed down through the generations, expressing itself in intimate deformations, a heady intertwining of the national and the personal. Yet despite the often depressingly familiar, repetitive nature of so much human business, Erdrich¹s eye is always fresh, her sentences never less than lyrical."

In an e-mail to the Associated Press, Erdrich said, "Getting this award would intimidate the hell out of me if I weren't so excited."

Earlier this year, Erdrich was awarded with the Dayton Literary Peace Prize distinguished achievement award for her body of work. Her novel "The Round House" was the 2012 winner of the National Book Award; "Plague of Doves" was a Pulitzer finalist in 2009, and "Love Medicine," her debut novel, won the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1984. She has also won five Minnesota Book Awards.

Erdrich, 58, lives in Minneapolis and is the owner of Birchbark Books.

P.S. Duffy's book on shortlist for Dayton Peace Prize

Posted by: Laurie Hertzel Updated: September 4, 2014 - 10:32 AM

Rochester novelist P.S. Duffy is on the long list for this year's Dayton Literary Peace Prize in fiction for her debut novel, "The Cartographer of No Man's Land." (Review here.)

The story of a Nova Scotia family during World War I, our critic called it a "beautiful novel about a terrible war."

Others in the running for the prize are: 

Fiction:

Alice McDermott, "Someone." (Strib review here)

Anthony Marra, "A Constellation of Vital Phenomena."

Antonio Munos Molina, "In the Night of Time."

Bob Shacochis, "The Woman Who Lost Her Soul."

Margaret Wrinkle, "Wash."

Nonfiction

Jo Roberts, "Contested Land, Contested Memory"

Steve McQuiddy, "Here on Edge: How a Small Group of WWII Conscientious Objectors Took Art and Peace from the Margins to the Mainstream."

Katy Butler, "Knocking on Heaven's Door." (Strib review here)

Jesmyn Ward, "Men We Reaped." (Strib review here)

David Finkel, "Thank You for Your Service." (Strib review here)

Karima Bennoune, "Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here."

The Dayton Literary Peace Prize is given annually to one work of fiction and one work of nonfiction that promotes peace, justice and understanding. Previous winners include Chang- rae Lee, Marlon James, Adam Johnson, and Adam Hochschild.

The winners will be announced Sept. 24. They will be honored at a ceremony on Nov. 9, when Louise Erdrich will also be honored with the 2014 Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award.

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