Matt Vensel is in his first year at the Star Tribune after covering the Ravens for the Baltimore Sun for six years. He is a Pittsburgh native and a Penn State grad. Follow him at @mattvensel.


Mark Craig has covered the NFL for 23 years, and the Vikings since 2003 for the Star Tribune. He is one of 44 Pro Football Hall of Fame selectors. Follow him at @markcraignfl.


Master Tesfatsion is the Star Tribune’s digital Vikings writer. He is a 2013 graduate of Arizona State and worked for mlb.com before arriving in Minneapolis. Follow him at @masterstrib.


Favre fails neurological exam again

Posted by: under Vikings, NFC, Leslie Frazier, Brett Favre, Leslie Frazier Updated: December 29, 2010 - 8:22 PM

Vikings quarterback Brett Favre took the baseline neurological test late Wednesday afternoon but still has yet to pass, according to NFL sources.

Vikings interim coach Leslie Frazier said Wednesday that Favre had last taken the baseline exam about three or four days ago. Despite Joe Webb's performance in the Vikings' victory at Philadelphia on Tuesday, Favre will get the start on Sunday against Detroit in the regular-season finale if he can go.

Favre, who suffered a concussion a week ago Monday against Chicago, was given his latest test after Frazier's news conference.

Favre, 41, has said this will be the final game of his 20-year career, although the fact he has retired twice before and then returned has left some skeptical. Frazier said after Tuesday's game and again Wednesday that Favre will be under center on Sunday if he's able.

The issue is that Favre has to pass a series of tests in order to get back on the field and the fact the Eagles game was postponed makes this a short week. The team will only practice on Thursday and Friday after being off on Wednesday.

Asked about the tests, Frazier said: “The first part, they’re checking, just a baseline check, take a look at what we did with him say back when training camp began. You measure that against what has happened after the concussion. So you’re trying to get a gauge of how close he is to what he was before.

"And then after that you’ve got to be able to find out if the guy can exercise without symptom. You’ve got to put him through a few different drills just to find out if he’s headache-free, he’s not experiencing dizziness or nausea or some of the things that you sometimes get when you have a guy that was concussed. So just a gamut of things that our medical people take him through.”

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