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McFadden campaign scrubs 'Stitches' ad over concerns from USA Hockey

Posted by: Abby Simons under Minnesota campaigns, National campaigns, Political ads, Democrats, Republicans Updated: August 29, 2014 - 10:44 AM

UPDATE: The McFadden campaign has reposted the ad online without the USA Hockey logo visible. View it here.

A campaign advertisement in which Republican U.S. Senate candidate Mike McFadden discusses removing his son's stitches with a pair of scissors has been scrubbed from the internet following concerns from USA Hockey about the appearance of their logo.

The advertisement, which has already finished its broadcast run, featured McFadden’s eldest son, Conor, telling the story about his father removing the stitches from a childhood hockey injury with a pair of scissors to save the $100 cost. McFadden said he intends to “take out Obamacare.”

“Send me to Washington and give me some scissors. I'll put 'em to work,” McFadden says at the ad’s close. McFadden, who is challening Democratic Sen. Al Franken, is known for his irreverent ads. The campaign has also used hockey imagery before.

In the advertisement, Conor McFadden sits next to a hockey table with a USA Hockey logo emblazoned on the side. However, the ad appeared to have vanished from the internet.

McFadden spokesman Tom Erickson said they removed the advertisements after they were contacted by USA Hockey.

 “They had gotten some calls from people who had seen the ad online and thought the organization was supporting Mike. This happened after the ad already ran its course on broadcast.”  Erickson said.
After the confusion, Erickson said the videos were removed “out of an abundance of caution.”

Mike Bertsch, assistant executive director of marketing and communications for USA Hockey, confirmed the organization's request for the campaign to remove the ads from the internet.

"We just don't allow our mark to be utilized in any capacity in any political activity; obviously we're neutral on the topic," he said. "Nothing against anybody, but we just can't allow the use of our marks like that."

Here's a still from the ad:


 

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