What’s making news in Minneapolis, reported by the Star Tribune’s team of city reporters. Send news tips to baird.helgeson@startribune.com.

Wednesday roundup: Vikings warming to city, an anti-domestic violence model, teacher contracts unsettled

Posted by: James Eli Shiffer under Local business, Parks and recreation, Politics and government, Public safety Updated: January 4, 2012 - 10:05 AM
From left, U.S. Sen. <a href=Amy Klobuchar, City Attorney Susan Segal, Ambar Hanson of Casa de Esperanza, police Chief Tim Dolan and Sharon Brice of the Domestic Abuse Project (photo by Elizabeth Flores)" />

From left, U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, City Attorney Susan Segal, Ambar Hanson of Casa de Esperanza, police Chief Tim Dolan and Sharon Brice of the Domestic Abuse Project (photo by Elizabeth Flores)

Advocates call it the "Minneapolis model": aggressive investigation and prosecution of domestic violence cases that have increased conviction rates of batterers and reduced domestic violence calls. U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a former prosecutor, held a roundtable discussion at City Hall this week with police Chief Tim Dolan, domestic violence advocates and others to offer Minneapolis's success story as a reason to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act, columnist Jon Tevlin reports.

After months of dissing Minneapolis, the Vikings appear to be warming to the prospect of staying in Minneapolis, albeit in a new stadium over on the west side of downtown, Mike Kaszuba reports. While promoting Rick Spielman to general manager after a dreadful 3-13 season, multitasking Vikings owner Zygi Wilf was displaying two maps of the Linden Avenue and Farmer's Market sites to legislative leaders, hoping to speed up a so-far elusive public subsidy deal. Meanwhile, Rafael Ortega, the Ramsey County commissioner who wants the Vikings to move to Arden Hills, became chairman of that board, Rochelle Olson reports. 

Minneapolis, St. Paul and about 200 other districts still haven't agreed on new contracts with teachers, Steve Brandt reports. Unlike in past years, however, there's no financial penalty for failing to reach an agreement before Jan. 15.

Folks in this newsroom were reminiscing about Charles Bailey, the bow-tie clad former editor of the Minneapolis Tribune who began his career as a cub reporter covering police, City Hall and general assignments in the early 1950s. He became a Washington correspondent who rubbed elbows with presidents and wrote seven novels on the side, Paul Walsh and Mary Lynn Smith report. He died this week at age 82.   

Housing for the living isn't the only thing booming in Uptown. Lakewood Cemetery welcomes the remains of future generations to its newest mausoleum opening this winter, Southwest Patch reports.

 

 

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