Page 2 of 2 Previous

Continued: Connections: Why solitude is bad for your health

  • Article by: KATY READ , Star Tribune
  • Last update: October 15, 2013 - 1:27 PM

Other people also provide intellectual stimulation. Gaugler said the most beneficial activities probably combine social interaction and intellectual challenge: “Staying active in the workplace in some way, volunteering in community groups and causes, joining clubs, square dancing, trying to learn a second language, learning to play chess.”

Without companionship, even eating may be more hazardous, Blom pointed out.

“Elderly people who isolate and live alone are much quicker to become malnourished and dehydrated, because for most of our lives eating is a social thing,” he said. “Pretty soon you’re popping a frozen dinner in the oven every day, with sodium and carbohydrates at levels you really shouldn’t be consuming.”

Katy Read • (612) 673-4583

  • related content

  • get related content delivered to your inbox

  • manage my email subscriptions

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

 
Close