AGING AMERICA: Unable to find a job or seeking change, baby boomers turn to entrepreneurship

  • Article by: MATT SEDENSKY , Associated Press
  • Updated: October 10, 2013 - 3:49 PM
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In this photo taken Aug. 23, 2013, David Mintz poses for The Associated Press inside his business, Tofutti, in Cranford, N.J. Mintz, the Tofutti CEO, maker of dairy-free products, says he wants his employees at Tofutti to have the trademarks of youth: energetic and enthusiastic, fresh thinking and quick to catch on, able to work at a frenzied pace, starting the day early and working late. He’s finding them in older workers. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. — Every passing month and unanswered resume dimmed Jim Glay's optimism more. So with no job in sight, he joined a growing number of older people and created his own.

In a mix of boomer individualism and economic necessity, older Americans have fueled a wave of entrepreneurship. The result is a slew of enterprises such as Crash Boom Bam, the vintage drum company that 64-year-old Glay began running from a spare bedroom in his apartment in 2009.

The business hasn't made him rich, but Glay credits it with keeping him afloat when no one would hire him.

"You would send out a stack of 50 resumes and not hear anything," said Glay, who had been laid off from a sales job. "This has saved me."

The annual entrepreneurial activity report published in April by the Kansas City, Mo.-based Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation found the share of new entrepreneurs ages 55 to 64 grew from 14.3 percent in 1996 to 23.4 percent last year. Entrepreneurship among 45- to 54-year-olds saw a slight bump, while activity among younger age groups fell.

The foundation doesn't track startups by those 65 and older, but Bureau of Labor Statistics data show that group has a higher rate of self-employment than any other age group.

Part of the growth is the result of the overall aging of America. But experts say older people are flocking to self-employment both because of a frustrating job market and the growing ease and falling cost of starting a business.

"It's become easier technologically and geographically to do this at older ages," said Dane Stangler, the research and policy director at Kauffman. "We'll see continued higher rates of entrepreneurship because of these demographic trends."

Paul Giannone's later-life move to start a business was fueled not by losing a job, but by a desire for change.

After nearly 35 years in information technology, he embraced his love of pizza and opened a Brooklyn, N.Y., restaurant, Paulie Gee's, in 2010. Giannone, 60, had to take a second mortgage on his home, but he said the risk was worth it: The restaurant is thriving and a second location is in the works.

"I wanted to do something that I could be proud of," he said. "I am the only one who makes decisions and I love that. I haven't worked in 3 1/2 years, that's how it feels."

Some opt for a more gradual transition.

Al Wilson, 58, of Manassas, Va., has kept his day job as a program analyst at the National Science Foundation while he tries to attract business for Rowdock, the snug calf protector he created to ward off injuries rowers call "track bites."

Though orders come in weekly from around the world, they're not enough yet for Wilson to quit his job.

"At this stage in my life, when I'm looking at in the near future retiring, to step out and take a risk and start a business, there was some apprehension," Wilson said. "But it's kind of rejuvenated me."

Mary Furlong, who teaches entrepreneurship at Santa Clara University and holds business startup seminars for boomers, says older adults are uniquely positioned for the move because they are often natural risk-takers who are passionate about challenges and driven by creativity.

There can be hurdles.

Though most older entrepreneurs opt to create at-home businesses where they are the only employee, even startup costs of a couple thousand dollars can be prohibitive for some. Also, generating business in an online economy is tougher if the person has fewer technological skills.

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