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Target's promotions get aggressive; Online store pickup gets $10 off

Posted by: John Ewoldt under Target Updated: July 31, 2014 - 8:46 AM

Target isn't "nickel and diming" its customers lately. You may have noticed that almost each week in its Sunday newspaper flier it offers a coupon for $5 to $20 off a specified category. This week it's $5 off a meat purchase of $20 or more (fresh, frozen or deli) and $5 off S-sport shoes. Last week it was $15 off a $50 purchase in the pet dept. (food, litter and treats) and $10 off a home furnishings purchase of $50 or more. Three weeks ago it was $20 off a $100 purchase in the baby department.

Pick up an extra copy of the circular w/ the coupon at the service desk or get a text on your smartphone while you're in the store (check signs in the highlighted department for the number).

Target hasn't cut back on promotional gift cards with purchase either. Recent amounts have varied from $5 to $100 with the purchase of Apple products, pet products, Advil, Charmin, Clorox and Burt's Bees.

But the promo that really surprised me is today's $10 off  a store policy, not a product. Through Saturday, Aug. 2, you can get $10 off an online order of $40 or more when you choose store pickup. That's a discount that's been promoted before but never discounted, said Target spokesman Eddie Baeb. He said the store pickup consistently makes up more than 10 percent of Target's online sales, but the company offered the promotion "to drive more engagement and use,"  since it debuted nationally in November 2013.

Kathee Tesija, Target’s executive vice president of merchandising, said late last year that the retailer would be offering "some eye-popping, irresistible deals" during the holidays and beyond. Eight months and many circulars later, I'm inclined to agree that the deals do seem better. The downside? Consumers have to spend more to get the savings, which hurts lower-income shoppers.

But I'd rather get a $5 savings in one fell swoop than have to collect ten 50 cent coupons.

 

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