Just Listed brings you the latest news and information from the Twin Cities-area commercial and residential real estate market and beyond from veteran reporters Jim Buchta and Kristen Leigh Painter.

After years on the market, a bidding war ensues and one of the Pillsbury mansions finds a buyer

Posted by: Jim Buchta under Architecture, Buying Updated: January 21, 2014 - 4:20 PM

After several years on the market, the storied 23,000 square-foot Pillsbury mansion on Blaisdell Avenue in south Minneapolis has a new owner. NuWay Inc, a non-profit that helps people overcome chemical dependency issues, paid $1.2 million for the building and plans to convert it back into housing. The Renaissance Revival mansion had been built in 1913 for John Pillsbury Snyder and his wife, Nelle, who a year earlier were aboard the Titanic when it sank on April 14, according to the AIA Guide to the Twin Cities. Both were rescued aboard life boat No. 7. In later years the house was been converted to commercial use in the early 1960’s and had been used most recently by Pinecrest Inc as a commercial office and showroom space. Built in 1913, the house had been on the market for more than two years and originally listed at $2.9 million. Mark Hulsey, managing broker of RE/MAX Results Commercial, received multiple offer on the property. “Blaisdell is a very unique property with multiple potential uses,” said Hulsey. “It was challenging to sell since the whole property required significant capital improvements for many explored uses.”

Star Tribune photos by MARLIN LEVISON Russell Underdahl and his family owned the former Pillsbury mansion and used it as a business headquarters for Pinecrest Doors, which makes high-end custom doors, grills and shutters. The mansion was packed with antique furnishings and wild game busts that the Underdahls have spent years acquiring. In this photo, Russell Underdahl climbed the marble stairway from the main living quarters to the upstairs bedroom and study areas.

Star Tribune photos by MARLIN LEVISON Russell Underdahl and his family owned the former Pillsbury mansion and used it as a business headquarters for Pinecrest Doors, which makes high-end custom doors, grills and shutters. The mansion was packed with antique furnishings and wild game busts that the Underdahls have spent years acquiring. In this photo, Russell Underdahl climbed the marble stairway from the main living quarters to the upstairs bedroom and study areas.

 

Star Tribune photos by MARLIN LEVISON Russell Underdahl and his family owned the former Pillsbury mansion and used it as a business headquarters for Pinecrest Doors, which makes high-end custom doors, grills and shutters. The mansion was packed with antique furnishings and wild game busts that the Underdahls have spent years acquiring. In this photo, Russell Underdahl climbed the marble stairway from the main living quarters to the upstairs bedroom and study areas.

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