NIKON P900

$599.95

Perhaps the last camera you'll ever buy

The Nikon P900 is a bridge camera, meaning it's a step beyond the pocket camera but not yet a full-blown digital single-lens reflex camera.

It does not have interchangeable lenses, but the lens it has is a doozy — enough for it to be in a subcategory called super zooms.

The autofocus speed is very fast, and the shutter lag (the time between pushing the shutter button and taking the picture) is to be quite good.

The P900's body is sturdy, with natural spots for your fingers to rest while you shoot. It's pleasing to hold and easy to use, but the navigation ring on the back is a bit small.

It has built-in Wi-Fi connectivity and GPS for geotagging pictures.

There is a Wi-Fi button on the back. Press it and the camera starts broadcasting its own wireless network. Connect your phone to it, and you have lots of choices.

There is a free app for iOS and Android devices that allows the camera to wirelessly offload its photos to a smartphone or tablet. The app also lets you see the camera's viewfinder, adjust the zoom and snap photos.

The P900 is no pocket camera. It's similar in size and weight to my Canon DSLR camera with its lens.

If you want a camera you can slip into your shirt pocket, there are better choices. But it's hard not to wonder whether the P900 might be the last camera you'll ever need to buy.

DALLAS MORNING NEWS

MOTIONX-GPS

$1

Store maps for when there's no signal

Navigation apps help users determine where they are and where they are headed. Google Maps is the market leader for free navigation apps, and Apple is making strides to catch up. But if you are planning to venture off road, paying for an app with more features might be a better option.

One of the better apps is MotionX-GPS for iOS devices, which has topographical and road maps that can be downloaded and stored for access in areas that do not have cellular coverage. For seafaring adventurers, marine maps are available. You can track your movements, mark waypoints of favorite locations, record routes and even add geotagged photos along your journey.

NEW YORK TIMES