The owners of the Minnesota Vikings have agreed to put more money — nearly $650,000 — into the $1 billion Minnesota Multipurpose Stadium.

The Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority is expected to rubber-stamp the additional money at a meeting Friday morning. The agenda for that meeting says only, "approve project budget amendments," but Michele Kelm-Helgen, who chairs the authority, provided more information in an e-mail with the caveat that the adjustments are tentative pending board action.

According to Kelm-Helgen, the Vikings have agreed to increase their contribution to the stadium by just under $648,000.

The Vikings' initial total contribution to the project was $477 million, but they have since added money for various projects.

The biggest chunk of the team's latest contribution, $234,889, would go toward "changing finishes and food service capabilities" on the second level of the stadium, which is under construction in downtown Minneapolis and expected to be completed in 2016.

The desire for enhanced concessions revenue was one of many reasons the Vikings wanted a new stadium.

The team and the authority also are working on changes to the "food service budget," but it was unclear whether they would be decided by the regularly scheduled meeting on Friday.

The Vikings also will pay $146,164 to redesign some seating and $116,266 to redesign their own locker room.

The team will pay half, $24,373, for the redesign to relocate the ushers' locker room. The other half already is in the budget, according to Kelm-Helgen's report.

And the Vikings also will pay half of the construction costs for the move — $67,484. Kelm-Helgen again said the other half already is in the budget.

Finally, the team will pay $58,741 to redesign exhaust louvers and fans.

At October's meeting, the Vikings increased their contribution by $518,000 by adding an eighth elevator and two concession stands, bringing the team's contribution to just shy of $527 million after previous additions.

The remainder of the cost will be covered by $150 million from the city of Minneapolis and $348 million from the state.