Above: Artwork by Kass Mossefin is available at the MCAD art sale.

The art’s still for sale. You just won’t get to see it in person until the curbside pickup.

To stay COVID-safe, the Minneapolis College of Art and Design is going virtual with its popular annual sale of original works by 225 students and recent alumni, viewable from the comfort of your computer or mobile.

The “exhibition” is free and organized as a virtual database of 2,300 artworks searchable by artist, medium, or price point ($1-$1500). It opens at 8 a.m. Friday and runs until midnight Saturday. But potential buyers can gain VIP early access starting Thursday at noon by giving $50 or more to the art sale scholarship. Visit here: https://mcad.edu/about-mcad/events/art-sale

One of the nation's largest student art sales, the MCAD event has become known as a place for collectors to scoop up emerging talent. Since it started in 1997, it has generated more than $3 million for emerging artists.

It also gives students an opportunity to learn how to sell and price their work to prospective buyers, and to connect with the broader Twin Cities art community. As in years past, 80% of proceeds go directly to the artists.

This year, students will have the added challenge of learning to market themselves virtually.

“The MCAD art sale remains a place where students can learn, and students need money during this time,” said Cindy Theis, Vice President of Institutional Advancement at MCAD. “None of that’s changed. The only thing that’s changed is we aren’t gonna be bumping into each other in the hallway.”

There are 15 categories of artworks, including painting, apparel, furniture, lithography, monotypes and more. Sneak peeks are available on MCAD’s Instagram and Facebook pages.

MCAD offers curbside pickup for all orders; artworks cannot be shipped. Only residents of Minnesota and Wisconsin can purchase artworks from the sale. 

Older Post

Remembering Bruce Swedien, the father of Twin Cities recording studios and Michael Jackson's engineer

Newer Post

Minneapolis actor to lead New York theater