A little more than a year after leaving the helm of Minneapolis ad agency ICF Olson, advertising veteran Margaret Murphy has started her own marketing company Bold Orange.

“I think the world can be a little bolder,” Murphy said, in an interview Tuesday. “It feels good to be bold. And at the same time, I think when we look at things and when we blend them together, we get the best output.”

Murphy’s vision for Bold Orange is to help modernize and invigorate loyalty, customer relationship management (CRM) and digital marketing.

“Loyalty and CRM can be really creative,” Murphy said. “When something speaks to you personally, that’s loyalty and that’s where we see the opportunity. The industry has transacted through people and what we want to do is bring in that authentic and relevant connection.”

Starting in 2011, Murphy served as president and chief operating officer of what was then called just Olson following its merger with Denali Marketing, where she had been president. Murphy led Olson during a time when it contributed to marketing campaigns for Skittles, Bissell, and the country of Belize.

In 2016, parent company ICF International consolidated Olson with some of its other agencies to create ICF Olson. Later that year, Murphy quietly left the company as the firm’s leadership was reconfigured.

During her gap year, Murphy explored her options and weighed going to other established companies but, ultimately, firms weren’t as progressive as she wanted them to be so she decided to start her own independent company.

Murphy said she wants to accomplish her business goals all while also pushing to improve society and help communities grow stronger.

While she wouldn’t yet go into detail, Murphy said she is working on a civic-minded project that she described as a “platform that allows families to do more with less.” Murphy also declined to name her corporate clients.

Murphy’s eight-person agency is currently housed at International Market Square in Minneapolis but has plans to move further into downtown.

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