Bird-banding at Springbrook Nature Center

  • Article by: LYNN KEILLOR SPECIAL TO THE STAR TRIBUNE
  • Updated: April 24, 2014 - 2:49 PM

At Springbrook Nature Center’s monthly bird-banding events, visitors can touch and even release a variety of species.

A Baltimore oriole was released after banding. This bird isn’t expected to make an appearance until Springbrook’s May bird-banding event.

Chickadees are rascals.

That’s what Krista Meyer tells me as we walk down a trail at Fridley’s Springbrook Nature Center. They’re fast, they’re hyperactive and they’re escape artists.

We’re checking a trap route as a part of the center’s monthly bird banding event, a tradition at the park since 1988.

As we approach a shoebox-size live trap at a designated spot in the park, we see a little black-capped chickadee bouncing around inside. Meyer gives me a sly look. “Do you want to get it out?”

Should an adult human be afraid of something that weighs a half-ounce? I’m about to find out.

Meyer removes the trap from its stand and sets it on the ground. I take the pint-size pillowcase she offers me and drape it over the trapdoor, just as I watched her do with other chickadees, nuthatches and woodpeckers. “They won’t realize the door is open if you do that,” she says.

I stick in my hand. Even though the bird is confined to an area not much larger than my hand, it manages to escape every grasp. Then I catch it. And then it bites me. And then it bites again but not enough to break skin and not enough to lose my grip.

I put my hand inside the pillowcase and hold the chickadee against my body, just like Meyer did. As I remove my hand, the chickadee gives one more chomp. Rascal. Good thing it’s cute.

Born out of a tornado

Meyer writes the location and time on a card and we head back to the interpretive center, where the bird will be weighed, measured and examined by volunteer Ron Refsnider. Refsnider, of Coon Rapids, is a federally licensed bird bander and helped start Springbrook’s banding program in May 1988. It’s been a monthly happening ever since.

Siah St. Clair, who retired last April as the nature center’s director, remembers the day he met Refsnider. A tornado had come through Fridley and lingered in the park for 16 minutes. Thousands of trees went down, reconfiguring habitats and the feel of the park.

Refsnider approached St. Clair and suggested monitoring birds to record the park’s regeneration. St. Clair, who had memories of banding birds as a youth with his dad, agreed.

They went through the park and determined 12 locations to collect birds — and those stations are still used today. This consistency and protocol have resulted in one of the best bird databases in the Midwest, St. Clair says. The database includes more than 18,000 captures. One of the chickadees we captured at March’s bird-banding event was collected for the 27th time. The record is a chickadee collected 48 times over an eight-year period.

Schoolchildren gather around a table as Refsnider pull each bird from its bag. Educating new generations of nature lovers is important to this program. Refsnider calmly explains what he’s doing while making his measurements.

Holding a downy woodpecker in his hand, Refsnider talks about the bird’s tongue. He speaks loud enough for everyone to hear, but he’s really focused on the kids. He opens the bird’s mouth and pulls out a long tongue. It looks like a little kid pulling and stretching on a mouthful of bubble gum.

“She can reach this tongue into a hole and probe for insects,” Refsnider tells the children.

“Like a frog?” an elementary student asks.

“Kind of, but it’s not sticky. It has a barb on the end, like a fishhook,” answers Refsnider.

  • related content

  • This robin was captured last year, but robins have been seen throughout the park this year, too. They will be captured and banded regularly throughout the spring and summer.

  • Ron Refsnider banded a black-capped chickadee. A federally licensed bander, Refsnider helped start Springbrook’s bird-banding program in 1988.

  • Volunteer Dean Krepela released one of just two pileated woodpeckers captured in the event’s 26-year history.

  • get related content delivered to your inbox

  • manage my email subscriptions

Click here to send us your hunting or fishing photos – and to see what others are showing off from around the region.

ADVERTISEMENT

Cleveland 0 Top 2nd Inning
Minnesota 0
Cincinnati - M. Leake 1:10 PM
Milwaukee - K. Lohse
Kansas City - J. Shields 1:10 PM
Chicago WSox - J. Quintana
Washington - S. Strasburg 2:10 PM
Colorado - J. De La Rosa
NY Mets - B. Colon 2:40 PM
Seattle - T. Walker
Detroit - A. Sanchez 2:40 PM
Arizona - T. Cahill
Los Angeles - D. Haren 6:05 PM
Pittsburgh - F. Liriano
San Francisco - M. Bumgarner 6:05 PM
Philadelphia - A. Burnett
Texas - Y. Darvish 6:05 PM
NY Yankees - D. Phelps
Boston - C. Buchholz 6:07 PM
Toronto - R. Dickey
Miami - N. Eovaldi 6:10 PM
Atlanta - E. Santana
Tampa Bay - A. Cobb 6:15 PM
St. Louis - L. Lynn
San Diego - I. Kennedy 7:05 PM
Chicago Cubs - T. Wada
Houston - B. Peacock 9:05 PM
Oakland - J. Chavez
Baltimore - C. Tillman 9:05 PM
LA Angels - J. Weaver
Chicago 9:30 PM
San Jose
Calgary 7/24/14 8:00 PM
Edmonton
Winnipeg 7/25/14 9:00 PM
Brt Columbia
Ottawa 7/26/14 6:00 PM
Hamilton
Toronto 7/26/14 9:00 PM
Saskatchewan
Winnipeg 7/31/14 6:00 PM
Hamilton
Connecticut 72 4th Qtr 1:37
Washington 82
New York 9:30 PM
Los Angeles
Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

question of the day

Poll: Should the lake where the albino muskie was caught remain a mystery?

Weekly Question

ADVERTISEMENT

 
Close