From hats to bats?

It’s a distinction that’s new to the Notebook archives: An apartment building will become the official home to a sports team. And a semifamous pig.

The developer of the 333 on the Park in the Lowertown neighborhood in St. Paul said this week that the building will become the official home of the St. Paul Saints baseball team, which plays nearby at CHS Field. The team's porcine mascot, Mudonna, was a special guest at the building’s grand opening.

The building was known as the Gordon & Ferguson building. It was designed by Clarence H. Johnston Sr. and was built in 1913 as the headquarters for what was once the largest hat maker in the region. The store eventually hosted an outdoor clothing line under the Field & Stream and Town & Country brands.

The eight-story 333 on the Park building, once known as Sibley Square at Mears Park, will have 134 market-rate units and several community spaces, including an art gallery that pays homage to Lowertown’s arts community.

The building has 24 floor plans, ranging from studios to three-bedroom apartments, and 10 two-story penthouses.

The building was developed by Timberland Partners, which will also own and manage it. The renovation was designed by Kaas Wilson Architects and built by Frana Cos.

Several Saints players will live in the building. In a statement, Chris Schwab, assistant general manager of the Saints, said the club is “excited to do our part in further revitalizing this truly one-of-a-kind neighborhood that makes Lowertown an ideal place to live and to play baseball.”

The gallery will participate in the St. Paul Art Crawl on April 28-30 and will feature rotating shows. It plans to showcase new works by known and up-and-coming artists. One show has been planned by Michael Schmidt, a Minnesota artist known for contemporary still lifes and works of colorful urban scenes around the Twin Cities.

Building amenities include a rooftop terrace with fire pits, TV and barbecue grills, a yoga studio, pet spa and heated underground parking.

JIM BUCHTA