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Jeanne d'Arc Living, based in Denmark, publishes magazines and books illustrating the French-Nordic style.

Kye R. Lee, Dallas Morning News

Close to home: Carpet know-how

  • January 5, 2013 - 12:48 PM
Carpet know-how

Is new carpet on your home-improvement wish list for 2013? You can learn what you need to know before you buy at a free "Carpet Conversation" at Gabberts.

Carpet and fine rug specialist R.J. Nohr will share insights on fibers, textures, hues and patterns.

The class will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday at Gabberts, 3501 Galleria, Edina. Reservations are requested: 952-928-3123 or www.gabberts.com

KIM PALMER

Home show

Now that the holidays are over, it's time to focus on the home front. If you're looking for ideas, the Home & Landscape Expo continues at the Metrodome this weekend and next, Friday through Sunday.

The show features seminars, exhibits and demonstrations from local and national companies on a wide variety of topics, including kitchen and bathroom remodeling, sunrooms and additions, flooring, energy-efficient windows and landscaping.

Hours are noon-8 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $6 for adults, free for ages 17 and under. For more information, visit www.homeshowcenter.com.

Homespun home

More and more, Americans are seeing an odd home-decorating synergy between French and Nordic styles.

A beautifully photographed Danish magazine titled Jeanne d'Arc Living propels the theme beyond its borders. The translation into English is not perfect, but it, like the homes and products depicted, comes off as charming, not unprofessional.

Most houses have the look of white on white and natural, light wood tones. Shades of gray and other neutrals are dominant, too, like the leaden skies and snowy landscapes seen through windows of houses in northern Europe.

Local foods, recipes, lifestyles, gardens and crafts also are included. The monthly magazine covers the same territory as Martha Stewart Living. But where Martha's decorating and entertaining projects are presented in terms of perfection, Jeanne d'Arc Living portrays a homemade, homespun reality that American fans of design magazines and books will find surprising.

It takes some getting used to. Beautiful chandeliers' wiring loosely trails up walls and across ceilings. Peeling paint and rust are made to appear elegant. Kitchens are amazingly outmoded, compared with American standards. It is refreshing, authentic, honest and simple.

The magazine's website (www.jeannedarcliving.com) lists shops where the magazine is sold, including two in Minnesota (Round Barn Pottery Co. in Andover and Petunia's in Excelsior). Jeanne d'Arc Living editors also produce books with recipes and holiday decorating tips.

DALLAS MORNING NEWS

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