With an insider’s eye, Hot Dish tracks the tastiest bits of Minnesota’s political scene and keep you up-to-date on those elected to serve you.

Contributors in Minnesota: Patrick Condon, J. Patrick Coolican, Patricia Lopez, Ricardo Lopez, Abby Simons, Rachel E. Stassen-Berger and Glen Stubbe. Contributors in D.C.: Allison Sherry and Jim Spencer.

Klobuchar worried about Bachmann running for Senate?

Posted by: under Minnesota U.S. senators Updated: December 14, 2010 - 9:58 AM

Is Sen. Amy Klobuchar concerned about a Michele Bachmann Senate run?

At least one supporter seems to think so.

Chicago-based public affairs strategist Rebecca Sive wrote on the Huffington Post that the Minnesota Democrat expressed concern during a recent conversation about Bachman running for Senate in 2012.

“It was stunning to me when caring Amy Klobuchar…told me she was concerned about the prospect of Michele Bachmann running against her for election to the U.S. Senate,” Sive wrote.

When contacted by Hot Dish, Sive downplayed any Bachmann threat, and her whole article is dedicated to making the case for Klobuchar and against Bachmann. Sive, who has known Klobuchar since law school (she went to Carleton College), said the two discussed a range of potential candidates.

But Sive’s article hinted at the Democrats' $13 million problem: Bachmann’s fundraisng haul in 2010 broke House records and put her ahead of most senators, and she still has $2 million left over from her House race.

At the same time, Bachmann has become a polarizing figure, as early state polling shows Klobuchar has a 17-point lead over Bachmann in a hypothetical matchup. Public Policy Polling, which conducted the poll, says Klobuchar is the most popular of 66 senators it measured in 2010.

The same firm also released a poll Monday, however, that found 36 percent of Minnesota Republicans want Bachmann to run against Klobuchar, 16 points higher than anyone else.

Gov. Tim Pawlenty, who is looking toward a higher office than the Senate in 2012, comes in second at 20 percent, followed by Norm Coleman at 14 percent and a handful of others in single digits.

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT