One singular sensation

  • Updated: January 25, 2014 - 5:54 PM

An undated handout photo of the Amborella plant, a species found only in New Caledonia, in the South Pacific. Scientists report they have sequenced its genome, indicating that the explosion of flowering plants in the late Cretaceous period followed a "genetic doubling event," a profusion of excess DNA in cells of the ancestor plant that eventually enabled a variety of new functions. (Sangtae Kim via The New York Times) -- NO SALES; FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY WITH STORY SLUGGED SCI WATCH BY SINDYA BHANOO. ALL OTHER USE PROHIBITED. ORG XMIT: XNYT19

Photo: Sangtae Kim via New York Times,

CameraStar Tribune photo galleries

Cameraview larger

Scientists have sequenced the genome of the Amborella plant, to reveal one thrilling combination: It’s the sole survivor of an ancient evolutionary lineage. The plant — which is found only on New Caledonia in the South Pacific — descends directly from the last common ancestor of all flowering plants. The scientists said in the journal Science that the analysis revealed the processes that paved the way for the diversity of more than 300,000 species of flowering plants. They said the genome provided conclusive evidence that the ancestor of all flowering plants evolved after a “genetic doubling event” — a profusion of excess DNA in cells that enabled a variety of new functions — about 200 million years ago. news services

  • get related content delivered to your inbox

  • manage my email subscriptions

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

 
Close