Rare mammal spotted in Vietnam

  • Updated: November 16, 2013 - 4:06 PM

This photo taken in 1993 and released by WWF shows a Saola in Vietnam when it was captured. It was one of two Saola captured alive in central Vietnam, but both died months later in captivity. Saola, one of the rarest and most threatened mammals on earth has been caught on camera in Vietnam for the first time in 15 years in September in central Vietnam, renewing hope for the recovery of the species, international conservation group WWF said Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013. (AP Photo/WWF)

Rare mammal is spotted A long-haired ox that is one of the rarest mammals on Earth was photographed in central Vietnam in September, renewing hope for the recovery of the species, the World Wildlife Fund said. It was the first photo of a saola in 15 years.

The animal — antelope-like, long-horned ox — was the first large mammal new to science in more than 50 years when it was discovered in high mountains near the border with Laos in 1992. Twenty years since they were first known to science, the elusive mammals remain hard to detect and little is known about them. No more than a few hundred, and perhaps only dozens, survive in the region’s remote, dense forests.

‘Huh?’ known around world

Are there words that are universally understood, across all countries and cultures? A team of linguists has proposed one: “huh.”

In a paper published in the journal PLOS One, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics announced that they had found strikingly similar versions in 10 languages scattered across five continents, suggesting that “Huh?” is a universal word. Linguists have made claims for other universal words, like “mama.” But there are many more variations for “mama” and “papa” than there are for “Huh?” noted Stanford linguist Herbert H. Clark.

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