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Continued: Big river, big trouble: Dredges working overtime to open Mississippi

  • Article by: JIM ANDERSON , Star Tribune
  • Last update: August 5, 2014 - 9:12 AM

As Hopkins, piloting a support boat, zoomed past a group of idled towboats and their loaded barges on a recent afternoon, he spoke of the urgency of the crew’s work.

“They will get the mission done,” Hopkins said. “And we’ll be out here until we get it done.”

 

Jim Anderson • 651-925-5039





 

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