This blog covers everything except sports and gardening, unless we find a really good link about using dead professional bowlers for mulch. The author is a StarTribune columnist, has been passing off fiction and hyperbole as insight since 1997, has run his own website since the Jurassic era of AOL, and was online when today’s college sophomores were a year away from being born. So get off his lawn.

Proper punishment for Target hackers?

Posted by: James Lileks under Technology Updated: December 26, 2013 - 1:55 PM

The mask slips: Sociopathic Billy drops all pretense; since there’s nothing in it for him anymore, it’s time to start beating up smaller, weaker people. It only took one day before he reverted to type.

His heavy-lidded look of casual malice will change soon when Jeffy’s well-placed kick changes the dynamics.

CRIME Brian Krebs broke the story of the Target data breach; now he follows the trail to Ukraine, where he finds a fellow who offers some numbers for sale. He writes: “ . . . debit card accounts stolen in the Target hack . . . ended up for sale on rescator[dot]la, a popular underground store. Today’s post looks a bit closer at open-source information on a possible real-life identity for the proprietor of that online fraud shop.” Indeed it does. Good read if you’re interested in this type of online sleuthing.

I have no idea if Rescator/Helkern/Andrew was involved in hacking Target, but it’s a good bet that he at least knows who was. I sought comment from various contact addresses listed above for this individual, and received a reply from someone at kaddafi[dot]me who said he knew Andrew and would relay my questions to him. Ultimately, he came back to me not with answers, but with a bribe not to run my story.

A transcription of the conversation follows, with pictures of the suspect He’s certainly not the only guy involved. What would be an apt punishment for inconveniencing 40 million people? Amputation of the hands would send a message and keep them from committing mischief in the future, but that seems a bit much. Maybe the crooks should be forced to wear thick fingerless mittens for a few years. The mittens would be equipped with ankle-bracelet tech, so they couldn’t be removed without setting off alarms. This way the crooks could use their hands to cook or hold a glass, but couldn’t type. No one wants their criminal having syndicate to be slowed down by mitten-handed guys who got caught the last time.

(via CityPages.)

STAY CLASSY Television newsreader has a viewer arrested over a tweet that mocked his dramatic story teases. The fellow was later released; the TV personality says it’s now a “mute point,” and there was more to the story than we know. His Twitter Bio:

Will devourer! Devourer of wills. Also from Mediaite, the most clumsily-named site on the internet, this Onionesque headline: AP Article About Limiting Nasty Internet Comments Gets Its Own Nasty Internet Comments 

ARTISTIC VANDALISM The Economist tells the tale of a typeface thought lost forever.

ON DARK evenings in late 1916, a frail 76-year-old man could often be seen shuffling furtively between The Dove, a pub in west London, and the green and gold turrets of Hammersmith Bridge. Passers-by paid no attention, for there was nothing about Thomas Cobden-Sanderson’s nightly walks to suggest that he was undertaking a peculiar and criminal act of destruction.

But what was he destroying?

Between August 1916 and January 1917 Cobden-Sanderson, a printer and bookbinder, dropped more than a tonne of metal printing type from the west side of the bridge.

Why? And how did they bring the typeface back to life? More here.

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