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Some things never change: time and money

Posted by: Lee Svitak Dean under Cookbooks, Healthy eating, Recipes Updated: October 11, 2010 - 6:05 PM

 

 

An article from Taste on Feb. 19, 1992, points out that cooks were stressed because times were tough in the '90s. And cooks didn't have the time for options from the past, the article said: like growing their own veggies or cooking in large quantities to handle several meals. Well,strategies for cooking cheap but healthfully, with time constraints, have evolved from the 1990s on.

Here are the two recipes that accompanied the story.

Turkey and Mushroom Meat Loaf
Serves 4.

From "The New Settlement Cookbook," edited by Charles Pierce. The book was a revised version of a collection of recipes originally printed in 1901 in Milwaukee by a community-service group of women who helped new immigrants from Europe adapt to life in America.

1 lb. mushrooms, cleaned and cut in halves or quarters
Juice of 1 lemon
1 onion, finely chopped
1 medium red pepper, finely diced
2 celery ribs, thinly sliced
1 lb. ground turkey
3/4 c. fresh bread crumbs
2 tbsp. freshly choppd parsley
1 egg
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Olive oil

DIRECTIONS

In the bowl of a food prpcessor fitted with a metal blade, combine mushrooms with lemon juice and onion. (This might have to be done in two batches. Add half the lemon juice and half the onion with each batch.) Process with quick pulses several times; scrape down the sides, and repeat until mushrooms are finely chopped and onion is incorporated.

In a heavy-bottomed, nonreactive saucepan, combine mushroom mixture with the red pepper and celery. Cook over moderately high heat until mushrooms start to exude moisture. (Mushrooms will give off much liquid. This evaporates quickly and will result in a smooth paste that will help bind the meat loaf.) Stir constantly until mixture is very thick and all liquid has cooked off, about 10 minutes. Empty into a bowl and allow to cool to room temperature before proceeding.This recipe can be done in advance to this point. After it comes to room temperature, cover tightly and refrigerate until ready to use.

In a bowl, combine the cooked mushroom mixture, turkey, bread crumbs, parsley and egg. Work quickly, stirring and-or mixing just enough to blend. Do not overwork or meat loaf will be tough. Season with salt and pepper.

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly oil a 1-quart loaf pan with olive oil. Gently pack in the turkey and mushroom mixture. Cover loosely with an oiled piece of aluminum foil. Bake until there are no traces of pink and juices run clear, 45 minutes to 1 hour. Let rest in pan for 10 minutes. Use a spatula or small plate to hold the meat loaf in place as you tilt the pan to pour off excess liquid. Carefully unmold loaf onto serving platter. Pour off excess liquid again. Garnish with additional parsley, if desired, and serve.

 

Pasta With White Beans, Tomatoes and Herbs
Serves 4.

From "The New Settlement Cookbook," edited by Charles Pierce. The book was a revised version of a collection of recipes originally printed in 1901 in Milwaukee by a community-service group of women who helped new immigrants from Europe adapt to life in America.

2 tbsp. butter
2 tbsp. finely chopped shallots or onions
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
3 to 4 medium tomatoes (1 1/2 lb.), peeled, seeded and chopped, or 1 (28-oz.) can drained and chopped
1 c. cooked white beans (navy or Great Northern)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 lb. shaped or hollow pasta (fusilli, rigatoni, ziti, or shells)
1/2 c. fresh parsley finely chopped

Directions
In a medium saucepan, melt butter over medium-high heat. Add shallots or onions and garlic. Cook until soft but not brown. Add tomatoes and cook until they begin to give off liquid and are warmed through, about 10 minutes. Stir in cooked beans. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

In a large amount of boiling salted water, cook the pasta until tender, about 7 to 10 minutes. Drain and empty into large mixing bowl. Toss with tomato and bean mixture, fresh parsley and more salt and pepper to taste. Serve at once.

 

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