Tidbits: More tempting

  • Article by: AL SICHERMAN , Star Tribune
  • Updated: March 16, 2011 - 3:46 PM

Also: A low-salt version of Worcestershire sauce.

Temptations Jell-O

More tempting

Was it only last week that Mr. Tidbit discussed Jell-O's six new premium-priced Temptations two-layer refrigerated puddings? (Yes, it was.) Had he delayed that grocery shopping trip for only a few days he would have found Jell-O's three even newer Temptations premium-priced two-layer pudding mixes: Chocolate Truffle Indulgence and Boston Creme Pie -- each topped with a rich chocolate "hard shell" (which Mr. Tidbit really liked) -- and Chocolate Mousse Decadence -- topped with chocolate mousse. The hard topping contains sugar, but the pudding mix is sweetened with aspartame and acesulfame potassium.

Mr. Tidbit feels duty-bound to point out that he finds the hard shell so deliciously satisfying because it is made with coconut oil, which has wonderful mouth-feel but is nastily high in saturated fat.

Mr. Tidbit also needs to observe that, unless your home happens to be furnished with eight classic 4- or 5-ounce glass cups, when you prepare these eight-serving mixes in cereal bowls or teacups they might not look quite as elegant as they do on the box. (You should have hung onto those little glass jars from Kraft Roka Blue.)

At the store where he bought the new pudding mixes, a six-serving box of regular Jell-O pudding mix was $1.55 and the new mixes were $2.79 -- 35 percent more per serving.

 

Classic redefined

Besides its original Worcestershire sauce, Lea & Perrins now offers a reduced-sodium version and new Thick Classic Worcestershire "great for dipping and topping," all at the same price.

The original sauce has 65 milligrams of sodium per teaspoon; the reduced-sodium version has 45. Oddly, Thick Classic has even less sodium -- 200 milligrams per 2-tablespoon serving (that would be 33 milligrams per teaspoon).

In fact, as you might guess from the much larger serving size, the Thick Classic sauce is quite different from the original: The second ingredient of Thick Classic is tomato puree; the original version contains no tomatoes at all.

So why call it "classic"? Why not?

AL SICHERMAN

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