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Continued: What you may not know about eating disorders

  • Article by: CHILDREN'S HOSPITALS and CLINICS OF MINNESOTA
  • Last update: March 27, 2014 - 10:50 AM

As illustrated above, eating disorders are complex. They may begin with a well-intended attempt to “get healthy” or “eat healthier.” Eating disorders also may look different for each child or adolescent. Some of the following may be warning signs that your child or adolescent is developing or has developed an eating disorder.

Physical signs:

  • Rapid or excessive weight loss
  • Dramatic weight gain
  • Development of fine facial or body hair
  • Lack of energy
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Feeling or complaining of being cold
  • Constipation
  • Vomiting
  • Dry skin
  • Hair loss
  • Dental erosion
  • Calluses on knuckles from self-induced vomiting
  • Decreased heart rate
  • Absent or irregular menstruation in females

 Cognitive signs:

  • Belief that he or she is “fat”
  • Afraid of gaining weight or becoming fat
  • Afraid of being able to stop eating
  • Denies having a problem or an eating disorder
  • Obsesses about body image, appearance or clothing
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Depression or withdrawal
  • Irritability
  • Self-worth appears strongly related to weight or shape
  • Obsessiveness 

Behavioral signs:

  • Refuses to eat normal types or amounts of food
  • Eats large amounts of food in a short period of time (binge-eating)
  • Self-induces vomiting
  • Over-exercising
  • Takes laxatives or diet pills
  • Hoarding, hiding or throwing away food
  • Engages in food rituals or has food rules, including calorie limits, measuring food or rules about what he or she should or shouldn’t eat
  • Categorizes food into “good” and “bad”
  • Refuses to eat “unhealthy” or “bad” foods
  • Eats only certain foods or only eats at specified times
  • Often says “I’m not hungry”
  • Makes excuses to avoid eating at mealtimes
  • Withdrawal from friends or activities
  • Eating in secret so that you are not aware of what he or she is eating

If you suspect that your child has an eating disorder or you have noticed some of these symptoms, it’s important to seek professional help as soon as possible. Trust your instincts as parents. Don’t wait until things get worse.

We encourage you to educate yourself and ask questions. We also encourage you to contact the Center for the Treatment of Eating Disorders at Children’s to schedule an appointment for your child to have a thorough evaluation and to explore treatment options. Contact us at 612-813-7179.

 

 

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