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Continued: Nebraska's new brain research center will seek to advance diagnosis, treatment of concussions

  • Article by: ERIC OLSON , Associated Press
  • Last update: July 4, 2013 - 6:48 PM

"We can get an idea of what area of the brain is being involved in the process, whether the speed of processing is at the rate it should be," Molfese said. "The different areas of the brain that normally integrate information quickly stop doing that, so that's another way we should be able to pick up whether there is an injury or not."

Molfese said the device, which should be ready for use within one to two years, eventually could be used in hospitals to screen patients for head injuries.

"It would be routine," he said, "and they'd know within 10 minutes."

Osborne said he's fascinated by the possibilities. He said suspected concussions were dealt with the same way throughout his football coaching career. The athletic trainer would hold up two or three fingers in front of the woozy player's face as he came off the field and ask him how many.

"If you could come close," Osborne said, "they'd put you back in. That wasn't very effective."

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  • Research assistant Kevin Real wears an EEG net as he looks at his brain activity on a monitor, at the University of Nebraska's Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior in Lincoln.

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