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Continued: Schafer: Lying to get a job is a sign of the times

  • Article by: LEE SCHAFER , Star Tribune
  • Last update: February 4, 2014 - 8:09 PM

Her advice is to ask for help from members of your church, other school volunteers, gardening club members, friends, neighbors, former colleagues, and just about anybody you encounter. Volunteering to build skills and a network is also a fine approach, she said, and “using strategies like these vs. lying is a no-brainer.”

It’s worth noting that suggestions to lie also draw some objections on Reddit, with some posters cautioning about the risk of being found out and then fired. Others make the common-sense point that what’s wrong about lying is still wrong even when growing desperate for a paying job.

Some of the advocates for lying, on the other hand, don’t seem to be looking for approval. Just understanding.

One of the Times posters suggested that being unemployed for a long time was just another Kobayashi Maru situation, which “Star Trek” fans ought to recognize.

The Kobayashi Maru turned out to be a training simulation for officer cadets facing a no-win scenario, as depicted in two of the films of the classic TV and film series.

Here’s the choice. Rescue a ship in distress — the Kobayashi Maru — and ignite a war. Or do nothing and listen as its entire crew dies.

The only cadet to ever beat the simulation was the lead character of the series, the future Capt. James Kirk. He did it by hacking the computer beforehand and changing the rules.

He wasn’t expelled for cheating. He was commended for his ingenuity.

lee.schafer@startribune.com • 612-673-4302

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