New York magazine’s July 27 issue features 35 Bill Cosby accusers on its cover.

The cover article, “‘I’m No Longer Afraid': 35 Women Tell Their Stories About Being Assaulted by Bill Cosby, and the Culture That Wouldn’t Listen,” includes tales of abuse related by Cosby’s alleged victims, including Louisa Moritz, now 68, who was an actress in 1971 and about to appear on “The Tonight Show” when, she says, the comedian opened the door of her dressing room.

“He never knocked. I knew it was Mr. Cosby. I’d seen his picture. He walked in and closed the door behind him. It went on for maybe four minutes, five minutes. But it was the longest five minutes that I ever experienced. And when they called my name, he ran out. When he walked down the stage, he introduced himself as Louisa Moritz. And then a huge laugh. When they called me to go onstage, I was a zombie. He didn’t look at me while we were on the show. I didn’t look at him. I just felt him. I was afraid to tell anybody. I knew who Mr. Cosby was and that prevented me from telling anybody. I felt ashamed. I was embarrassed to be me.”

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The feature appears one week after the public release of a deposition by Cosby in which he admitted to dosing women with Quaaludes.

“He reached over and he put a pill next to my wine glass,” said Victoria Valentino, 72, a former Playboy bunny who claims she was assaulted Bill Cosby in 1969. “He said, ‘Take this. It’ll make you feel better. It’ll make us all feel better.”

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The magazine called the 46 women who have come forward to accuse Cosby “‘a sorrowful sisterhood’ of women united by their dark experiences, steadfast in their resolve to remain silent no more.”

So far, 46 women have come forward to accuse Bill Cosby of sexual assault, in some cases, according to a recently unsealed deposition, with the aid of quaaludes—a powerful sedative that can render a person functionally immobile. But these allegations are by no means new, with some stretching back decades—to a time when the culture of rape in America left victims little recourse but to suffer silently, and in shame. Today, the way we think and talk about rape has evolved, creating a safer space for survivors to feel empowered by speaking up and reclaiming their victimhood. And that’s led us here. Of the 46 women who have come forward to accuse Cosby, we spoke to 35 of them — “a sorrowful sisterhood” of women united by their dark experiences, steadfast in their resolve to remain silent no more. Read more: nymag.com/cosby-women.

Victoria Valentino, 72, a former Playboy bunny, was allegedly assaulted by Bill Cosby in 1969. Valentino was dining with her roommate at their usual joint, Café Figaro, where Cosby happened to be part owner. He knew that Valentino’s 6-year-old son had recently died, and he told Valentino’s friend that he thought she could use some cheering up. "He took my roommate and me out to dinner. It was this new hip steak restaurant on the strip near the Whiskey a Go Go called Sneaky Pete’s. He was chatting her up and trying to charm her. And he reached across and put a pill next to my wine glass and said, ‘Here, this will make you feel better,’ and he gave her one. I wasn’t really thinking. I thought, Great, me feel better? You bet. So I took the pill and washed it down with some red wine. And then he reached across and put another pill in my mouth and gave her one. Just after I took the second pill, my face was, like, face-in-plate syndrome, and I just said, ‘I wanna go home.’ He said he would drive us home. We went up this elevator. I sat down, and lay my head back, just fighting nausea. I looked around and he was sitting next to my roommate on the loveseat with this very predatory look on his face. She was completely unconscious. I could hear the words in my head, but I couldn’t form words with my mouth, because I was so drugged out." Tap the photo to hear Victoria Valentino tell her story, and watch her video interview at nymag.com/cosby-women.

Louisa Moritz, 68, an actress, was allegedly assaulted by Bill Cosby in 1971. Moritz was getting ready to appear on the 'Tonight Show' when someone opened the door of her dressing room. “He never knocked. I knew it was Mr. Cosby. I'd seen his picture. He walked in and closed the door behind him. It went on for maybe four minutes, five minutes. But it was the longest five minutes that I ever experienced. And when they called my name, he ran out. When he walked down the stage, he introduced himself as Louisa Moritz. And then a huge laugh. When they called me to go onstage, I was a zombie. He didn't look at me while we were on the show. I didn't look at him. I just felt him. I was afraid to tell anybody. I knew who Mr. Cosby was and that prevented me from telling anybody. I felt ashamed. I was embarrassed to be me." Tap the photo to hear Louisa Moritz tell her story, and watch her video interview at nymag.com/cosby-women.