Page 2 of 2 Previous

Continued: Syrian troops capture historic mosque in central city of Homs amid fierce government offensive

  • Article by: ALBERT AJI , Associated Press
  • Last update: July 27, 2013 - 2:05 PM

Saturday's announcement on the possible U.N. probe agreement on Khan al-Assal coincided with government allegations that the rebels committed "a massacre" in the village, killing 123 "civilians and military personnel," according to a SANA report. SANA said others are still missing.

The report said "terrorists" were behind the recent killings in Khan al-Assal, a term the government uses for rebels. The Observatory previously said at least 150 government soldiers were killed on Monday and Tuesday there, some after they had surrendered.

A statement released by al-Qaida-linked Jabhat al-Nusra — or the Nusra Front — said 150 soldiers, pro-government gunmen and Shiite militiamen were killed in Khan al-Assal. The statement said fighters captured 63 soldiers alive but 55 of them fled. Nusra Front said its members killed 15 of them before 40 surrendered. The statement did not say if the 40 were still alive.

The conflicting claims could not be independently reconciled.

In Aleppo, a rocket fired by government forces into a rebel-held district killed at least 29 including 19 under the age of 18 and four women, the Observatory said Saturday. The attack happened Friday during government shelling in the Bab al-Nairab neighborhood of Aleppo.

Syria's conflict began in March 2011 largely as peaceful protests against Assad's rule. It escalated into a civil war after opposition supporters took up arms to fight a brutal government crackdown on dissent.

More than 100,000 people have been killed in the conflict, according to the U.N.'s recent estimate.

  • get related content delivered to your inbox

  • manage my email subscriptions

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

 
Close