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Continued: Lack of babies slows population growth

  • Article by: JOHN MCCORMICK , Bloomberg News
  • Last update: March 28, 2014 - 12:19 AM

Urban areas and closer-in suburbs still had faster growth than exurbs as workers avoided the economic risks associated with selling homes or looking for new jobs.

Exurbs as a whole grew 0.57 percent during the year ending last July, while urban areas grew 0.81 percent and mature and emerging suburbs recorded a rate almost twice of the exurbs, Frey’s analysis shows. That still was an increase for the exurbs, which had growth of 0.35 in 2010-11 and 2011-12.

Areas rich with oil and natural gas in and near the Great Plains continue to record some of the fastest population growth as workers are drawn to jobs there, the Census Bureau said.

Of the nation’s 10 fastest-growing metropolitan statistical areas, six were within or near the Great Plains: Odessa, Austin and Midland, Texas; Fargo and Bismarck, N.D.; and Casper, Wyo.

“When the economy is slow, people will go where there are jobs,” Frey said.

Seven of the 10 fastest-growing “micropolitan” statistical areas, which contain an urban cluster of between 10,000 and 49,999 people, were in or adjacent to the Great Plains.

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