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Continued: Parents: Minnesota High School League transfer policy unfair to disabled

  • Article by: ALEJANDRA MATOS , Star Tribune
  • Last update: December 7, 2013 - 10:07 PM

Just before the two sides met in a hearing in October, the league relented and said Van Klei’s son could play varsity, Jepsen said.

Jepsen said it typically costs her clients $3,000 to $4,000 to challenge the league on the transfer policy. Each of her clients’ students already played varsity at their old schools.

Another family, which did not want to be identified, transferred their son to a smaller school in Minneapolis in 2012 after he was found to have attention deficit disorder. The parents had to provide the league with letters from doctors, psychologists and his prescription history.

Jepsen, who has not yet filed any lawsuit against the league, said its policy is a clear violation of the law, which requires organizations like the league to modify their rules to allow a student with a disability an equal opportunity to participate in an activity such as varsity sports.

In another one of Jepsen’s cases, a sophomore with neuropsychological disabilities transferred to Achiever Academy in Vadnais Height after he had been struggling at a different school for years. Jepsen said the league has not yet decided in that case, which has been in the appeal process for more than three months. The league, Jepsen said, has taken the position that the student is responsible for his problems.

Alejandra Matos • 612-673-4028 Twitter: @amatos12

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