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Continued: Sanimax plans to build biogas plant in South St. Paul

  • Article by: NEAL ST. ANTHONY , Star Tribune
  • Last update: May 25, 2013 - 5:01 PM

McGee, who fell behind on her CitiMortgage Inc. mortgage after losing her job with Achieve Minneapolis in 2011, eventually sued CitiMortgage and Fannie Mae for wrongful foreclosure as she was trying to arrange a loan modification. McGee’s attorney, Jonathan Drewes in Minneapolis, said the parties are now close to settling the case in a way that allows her to remain in her home.

“Rose is thrilled at the outcome and my law firm is happy that we’re able to help Rose and others like her facing foreclosure,” Drewes said in an interview.

McGee was married to William McGee, Hennepin County’s chief public defender, until his death in 2000.

Jennifer Bjorhus

lindquist’s Pham wins diversity award

Chris Pham, an attorney with Lindquist & Vennum, has been named this year’s recipient of the Hennepin County Bar Diversity Award.

Pham works with the Young Lawyers Group of Twin Cities Diversity in Practice for leadership in advancing Diversity’s mission of attracting, recruiting, retaining and advancing young lawyers of color in local law firms and corporate legal departments.

Pham also serves as a board member of nonprofit youth enterprises Cookie Cart and Minnesota Girls Rock. He regularly volunteers with at-risk inner-city youth and minorities interested in the legal profession. He also participates in diversity work with William Mitchell College of Law and represents needy minority clients through Children’s Law Center of Minnesota.

“Diversity in the legal profession may have come a long way, but it has a long way to go,” said Pham. “I’m proud to be at a law firm that supports my passionate and sincere approach to improving diversity by allowing me to serve historically underrepresented individuals … and be involved with an organization like Twin Cities Diversity in Practice.”

 

 

 

 

advocate bemoans 2013 legislative session

Mike Hickey of the National Federation of Independent Business Minnesota chapter said that the $2.1 billion tax increase enacted by the Legislature hurts Minnesota’s reputation as a place to do business. Lawmakers approved a 9.85 percent marginal income tax rate on taxable household income over $250,000. Proponents said it would affect only the top 2 percent of Minnesota earners. Lawmakers also added a sales tax on some business services.

“Some businesses are really going to get clobbered due to this new sales tax on some essential business services, and the impact may be far worse than expected,” Hickey said.

Democrats and Gov. Mark Dayton called the boosts in spending for preschool-to-post-secondary education an investment in workforce training.

Businesspeople, some of whom supported increased education and transportation funding, got estate tax relief on small-business or farm property that is placed in a trust, plus a front-end exemption from the sales tax on the purchase of capital equipment. Hickey, saying the session proved negative for small business overall, applauded passage of a “significant unemployment insurance tax reduction.’’

 

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