After months of campaigning, the nation’s first caucuses are here, and the result is far from decided. Polls out of Iowa have shown shifting front-runners, and four of the candidates have been tied up in Washington for Trump’s impeachment trial. Here’s where they stand.

Bennet

The senator from Colorado plans to spend Iowa caucus night in New Hampshire, where he said he’s going “all in.” That state’s primary is Feb. 11.

Biden

The former vice president has consistently been at or near the top of polls in Iowa, but his name is also wrapped up in the impeachment trial.

Bloomberg

The former New York mayor entered the race late, and he’s skipping the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary to focus on later-voting states.

Buttigieg

The former mayor of South Bend, Ind., has escalated his attacks on Sanders and Biden in recent days in an effort to clinch a strong finish in Iowa.

Gabbard

The U.S. representative from Hawaii is putting her time in in New Hampshire, where she snowboarded with supporters in the White Mountains.

Klobuchar

The senator from Minnesota is hoping neighboring Iowa will give her candidacy a boost, but she has struggled to break into the top tier in polls.

Patrick

The former Massachusetts governor joined the race late and has a lot of ground to make up. He’s focusing on New Hampshire and South Carolina.

Sanders

The senator from Vermont saw a late surge in Iowa, but the self-described democratic socialist faces electability concerns in a general election.

Steyer

The billionaire businessman has participated in the past four debates and spent heavily on TV ads, but his campaign has struggled to catch on.

Trump

The president has no serious GOP challengers in the primary, but he enters the voting season with the dark cloud of impeachment following him.

Warren

The senator from Massachusetts has been endorsed by the Des Moines Register and other newspapers, but she has slipped in the polls since fall.

Yang

The entrepreneur said that if he does not get enough support to be a viable candidate in the caucuses, his supporters “would naturally head to Bernie.”