Despite it being a single, vaguely humorous product, activists who despise her father declared victory. Meanwhile, Donald Trump’s supporters (and those of his daughter) lashed out. Bed Bath & Beyond decided to walk back the rep’s statement, assuring shoppers that although Ivanka’s wares were no longer available online, they could still be found in some stores.

Versions of this saga have played out among other retailers that sell Trump-branded goods. When Ivanka Trump products vanished from Belk’s website in February, the company told customers the decision was part of “normal” business operations and that Trump’s line was available at its three flagship stores. Her products also no longer appear on the website of Burlington Coat Factory, although they’re still carried in its physical stores. Same goes for Saks Off 5th and Stein Mart.

Then there’s TJ Maxx and Marshall’s, both owned by TJX Cos., which sent a note to employees instructing them to take down signs bearing the Ivanka Trump name and logo, according to the New York Times. Trump wares were removed from special featured displays and mixed into the regular racks. “All Ivanka Trump signs should be discarded,” the note said. Again, the company assured customers that it would continue to sell her merchandise in its stores.

A spokesperson for Ivanka Trump’s brand said it has no control over how its products are merchandised, and that rotating products from online to in-store is typical. The closely held company licenses her name to vendors that make goods, including a $100 million clothing line made by G-III Apparel Group, as well as shoes and accessories.

She has transferred its assets to a trust overseen by relatives of her husband, Jared Kushner, retaining ownership and receiving payouts.