Here are some one-hitter nuggets that didn't make the dead-tree edition of the paper today:

One of the age-old questions is who has the advantage when a pitcher meets a team for the second time in a short span of days? There is no right answer. But the fact that Santana has thrown 15 shutout innings at the White Sox in less than a week is eye-opening.
I heard some White Sox officials chatting amongst themselves before the game that they hoped their hitters would make some adjustments against Santana. There was no sign of that on Saturday. What about Santana?
"It's not easy because they already saw you like three days ago," Santana said. "To me, the big key was to keep the ball down for the most part and mix it up."
Santana's stuff has been sharp all year. And the White Sox lineup has some soft spots in it. But, remember, its about execution. Santana is at the top of his game right now.
Catcher Chris Gimenez praised Santana for dominating twice in one week.
"Kudos to him he did a tremendous job the last time we played there, too," Gimenez said. "He was able to just go out there and attack the zone. Use their aggressiveness against them because they are trying to scrap and claw and get back in that game and sometimes they are expand the zone when it happens."

.....

Santana didn't let up when the Twins gave him a 5-0 lead. That's big enough of a lead for a pitcher to relax, just throw the ball over the plate and let opponents hit it at someone. Santana stuck with his game plan and did not pitch to the scoreboard.
"Not at all," Santana said. "Don't try to think ahead of myself."

.....

There were no plans, at least right after the game, for Santana to go out and celebrate his gem. I asked him how he celebrated after he no-hit the Indians in 2011 (Cleveland did score an unearned run). He said there was no time to celebrate.
"I didn't have any time because I had to do all the interviews," Santana said.
Oh.

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Dozier's sore knee knocks him out of today's Twins lineup vs. White Sox

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Dozier texts his manager early Easter morning: Let me play today