Grant Hart in 2000 after the release of his "Good News for Modern Man" album. / Jeff Wheeler, Star Tribune

Grant Hart in 2000 after the release of his "Good News for Modern Man" album. / Jeff Wheeler, Star Tribune

Starting with Hüsker Dü’s early-'80s singles and continuing through his sometimes-prolific solo career and short run with Nova Mob, Grant Hart recorded 14 studio albums plus a wide variety of EPs and assorted bits. Here’s an elementary rundown of some of his most classic material upon the news of his death Thursday.

Click here to read our full obituary on Hart, 56.

“It’s Not Funny Anymore” (1982)

The catchy but bruising song appeared on 1982’s scrappy “Metal Circus," Hüsker Dü’s first studio effort for SST Records, which boasted another Hart song that would remain one of his staples, “Diane.”

“Never Talking to You Again” (1984)

What’s an acoustic guitar doing on a punk album? From the revered “Zen Arcade” double album, this one would be played by Hart at his only onstage reunion with ex-bandmate Bob Mould, when the two appeared together at the Rock for Karl benefit concert for Soul Asylum bassist Karl Mueller at the Quest nightclub in 2004. Dave Grohl recently covered it among many others.

“The Girl Who Lives on Heaven Hill” (1985)

This fan favorite from the “New Day Rising” album showed off Hart’s powerful, howling vocals and offered an early hint of his struggles with addiction. 

“You Can Live at Home” (1987)

The crescendoing finale to Hüsker Dü’s final effort, “Warehouse: Songs & Stories,” another double-LP.

“2541” (1988)

Hart kicked off his solo career with this single for SST, later re-recorded for his debut solo album “Intolerance.” The title refers to the address that used to house Kay Bank Studio and then Twin/Tone Records, 2541 Nicollet Av., which Husker Du later used as a rehearsal and recording space, while the address on the cover photo was a house at nearby 2541 Garfield Av.

"Now That You Know Me" (1989)

The opening organ and harmonica showed Hart exanding his sonic palette on "Intolerance," issued by SST to widespread praise.

“Where You Gonna Land (Next Time You Fall Off of Your Mountain)” (1991)

The standout track from Hart’s first album with his post-Hüskers band Nova Mob, “The Last Days of Pompeii.”

“A Letter from Anne Marie” (2000)

Hart puts aside his punky past in this soulful gem from “Good News for Modern Man,” a solo album for Pachyderm Studio’s namesake label. Hart felt the record was poorly promoted, and it led to a lengthy hiatus from recording.

“You’re the Reflection of the Moon on the Water” (2009)

Hart finally reemerged on record again, sparking up what would remain a long-standing working partnership with Minneapolis studio operator and Rank Strangers frontman Mike Wisti with the album “Hot Wax.”

“So Far from Heaven” (2013)

Hart’s final album before his death, “The Argument,” may have been the most ambitious of his career, a 20-song collection for Domino Recordings based on 17th century poet John Milton’s epic “Paradise Lost.”

Older Post

Gene Simmons and Ace Frehley to kiss and make up at St. Paul charity concert

Newer Post

Punk heroes X sound vital, timeless on 40th anniversary tour at First Avenue