Most parents allow themselves certain fibs to tell their children: Yes, sweetheart, there is a Santa Claus. Your 14-year-old dog Rusty is enjoying his golden years, scampering around a farm. Animated movies were made just for you.

That last lie is in heavy rotation this summer with the release of “Inside Out,” a blockbuster that’s for the ages and works for all ages. Children may leave the film, which takes place inside a little girl’s evolving brain, pining for a toy replica of Bing Bong the elephant-cat, while their folks will wonder why their college psychology classes weren’t nearly this thought-provoking.

But “Inside Out” isn’t the first animated movie to talk to grown-ups on a whole other level. Here are 10 classics (including the new Pixar film) well worth re-watching after putting the young’n’s to bed.

 

“Inside Out” (2015)

Why kids think it’s for them: The journey by Joy and Sadness across the cranium plays out like a Disney World ride — but without the long lines.

Why it’s really for grown-ups: The overall theme — all emotions are vital, even the scary ones — could easily be a lost chapter from a Sigmund Freud journal.

– Sadness

 

“The Iron Giant” (1999)

Why kids think it’s for them: Who wouldn’t want to hang out with the Transformers’ lovable granddaddy?

Why it’s really for grown-ups: This story about fear and paranoia in the 1950s reminds us that the Cold War can still give us the chills.

– Robot guardian Hogarth Hughes

 

“Fantastic Mr. Fox” (2009)

Why kids think it’s for them: Silky smooth Mr. Fox, voiced by silky smooth George Clooney, is the perfect precursor to Holden Caulfield.

Why it’s really for grown-ups: Director Wes Anderson (“The Royal Tenenbaums,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel”) shows that quirky families feel right at home in cartoon country.

– Mr. Fox

 

“Chicken Run” (2000)

Why kids think it’s for them: Birds of a feather flock together when parents try to tighten the screws.

Why it’s really for grown-ups: Voice contributor Mel Gibson’s words from “Braveheart” — “They make take our lives, but they will never take our freedom” — ring just as true down on the farm.

– Oppressive human Mrs. Tweedy

 

“Toy Story 3” (2010)

Why kids think it’s for them: Barbie dolls and Mr. Potato Heads are a lot more fun after dark.

Why it’s really for grown-ups: It doesn’t take a high school diploma to figure out this is really about holding back the tears while shuttling your teenagers off to college.

– The two-faced Lots-o’-Huggin’ Bear

 

“Who Framed Roger Rabbit” (1988)

Why kids think it’s for them: Gee, Mom and Dad’s cartoon buddies are just as goofy as SpongeBob SquarePants.

Why it’s really for grown-ups: If Bugs Bunny and Mickey Mouse can get along, Israel and Palestine can’t be far behind.

– Jessica Rabbit

 

“Kiki’s Delivery Service” (1989)

Why kids think it’s for them: The original version may be in Japanese, but a teenage girl’s ability to fly and cast spells is a draw with no language barriers.

Why it’s really for grown-ups: Introspection can ruin the best of flights.

– Kiki

 

“It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown” (1966)

Why kids think it’s for them: Getting apples during trick-or-treating is still better than receiving a bag full of rocks.

Why it’s really for grown-ups: Belief in the return of the Chosen One is more important than an actual resurrection.

– Linus Van Pelt

 

“The Lion King” (1994)

Why kids think it’s for them: Sex, death and family aren’t as scary as they first appear.

Why it’s really for grown-ups: Sex, death and family aren’t as scary as they first appear.

– Mufasa

 

“Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” (1964)

Why kids think it’s for them: Nothing, but nothing, is going to stop Santa from delivering that Red Ryder BB Gun.

Why it’s really for grown-ups: A reminder to anyone who’s been bullied at school or at work that it’s going to get better.

– Hermey, the elf who dreams of becoming a dentist

 

Twitter: @nealjustin