BEARTEK GLOVES $100

Device warms hands and controls phone

It’s a new world when you talk about gloves being connected. We decided to test BearTek gloves, gaining buzz after Blue Infusion Technology founders Tarik Rodgers and Willie Blount were on “Shark Tank.”

The BearTek gloves we tested are aimed at outdoor adventure enthusiasts, such as motorcycle riders, skiers and snowboarders.

They have small sensors to activate different commands. The sensors are activated by tapping your thumb to various touch pads embedded along the sides of the glove fingers. For example, touching your thumb to a touch pad on the side of your index finger will answer or hang up the phone or start and stop the music. The touch-pad system works well and becomes intuitive after a few minutes of practice. You can use the controls without looking down at your hands.

One thing you have to get used to is the gloves’ sleep feature. You have to press a power button on the thumb to wake the glove each time you want to send a command.

The gloves have modules for Wi-Fi/GPS or Bluetooth/phone. Gloves come with one of the modules; the other would be available separately. You can only use one module at a time.

The modules are small and have batteries that recharge via microUSB cable.

The BearTek second generation is coming out later this year and will connect at the same time to Bluetooth and Wi-Fi.

DALLAS MORNING NEWS

 

HONK APP Free

An app to help when there’s car trouble

The Honk app helps travelers who have car trouble use their mobile phone or tablet to connect with more than 35,000 roadside assistance providers. Available round-the-clock, daily. The app is free, but there is a charge for service.

Honk is a viable alternative for drivers who can’t afford an annual membership or don’t often use the plan and are tempted to cancel it. It would be nice to know the price of a service before summoning assistance. The app quoted a price of $75, including tax and tip, to jump a battery in a 2009 Prius on the freeway in Carlsbad, Calif. However, a line said, “Book now, while rate is available.” Uncertainty like that adds anxiety to an already stressed customer.

LOS ANGELES TIMES