Brian Britz’s 2-year-old daughter cannot sit in a regular shopping cart because of health issues and development delays. That means shopping is a family affair with one parent pushing the medical stroller while the other pushes the shopping cart.

To alleviate the difficulties that parents like his face, Target said that by March 15 the majority of stores will have at least one Caroline’s Cart, and many will have more, depending on guests’ needs. The smallest Target stores that don’t have full-sized shopping carts will not carry Caroline’s Cart.

Caroline’s Cart looks like a traditional shopping cart, but with a large open seat with a five-point harness that faces the shopper. It eliminates the task of simultaneously pushing a wheelchair or stroller and a cart.

“These carts will be amazing because we’ll only need the cart instead of both a stroller and a cart,” the Coon Rapids dad said. “This will make it more efficient.”

Target started testing the carts in select stores last year after a Target employee with a child who has special needs suggested the idea.

“Caroline’s Cart can be a game-changer for families, and we’re excited to offer this for our guests across the country,” said Juan Galarraga, senior vice president, store operations. “Target is always looking for new ways to make guests feel welcome in our stores and give them a more comfortable shopping experience.”

Target is one of several retailers in Minnesota that have tested or introduced the carts. Last year, Cub Foods made the carts available at all of its Minnesota stores.

They also are available at Hy-Vee stores in Oakdale, New Hope, Marshall and Winona, Marketplace Food and Drug in Bemidji and Moose Lake, Kenwood Super One Foods in Duluth, Jerry’s Foods in Woodbury, among others.

The cart was invented by Alabama parents Drew Ann and David Long after they realized their daughter, Caroline, who has special needs, would outgrow the regular shopping cart. The special cart is now available at retailers in 47 states and Canada.