The Weeknd

The Weeknd, he of the angelic voice and wondrous hair, is often compared to Michael Jackson. His voice can be smooth or rhythmic, and his songs are innovative and fresh. But his music is darker and moodier than Jackson’s. The “Can’t Feel My Face” and “Starboy” hitmaker makes his first headline appearance in the Twin Cities. (Sept. 24, Xcel Energy Center, St. Paul, $39.75-$125.75, ticketmaster.com)

Fleet Foxes

After a five-year hiatus, the Seattle-area indie-folk band with the mountainous harmonies picked up where it left off — sans drummer Josh “Father John Misty” Tillman, of course — on its third album, “Crack-Up.” Frontman Robin Pecknold continues to write like he should’ve been the fourth member of Crosby, Stills & Nash (sorry, Mr. Young). The band wisely settled on two nights at an acoustically rich venue instead of one at a crummier spot. (Sept. 30 & Oct. 1, Palace Theatre, St. Paul, sold out.)

Angel Olsen

With her PJ Harvey-like purr-to-wail voice and Lou Reed-ian guitar work, the St. Louis rocker jumped out of the buzz bin with impressive force last year with her third album, “My Woman,” anchored by the single “Shut Up Kiss Me” and other coolly aloof or tenderly sweet tunes. She’s overdue for her First Avenue debut. (Oct. 2, First Avenue, Mpls., $25, first-avenue.com)

Chris Stapleton

Stapleton is a maverick country singer who sings for both hillbillies and hippies. He’s the force behind the transformative 2015 album “Traveller” and the songwriter of Kenny Chesney’s “Never Wanted Nothing More,” George Strait’s “Love’s Gonna Make It Alright” and Luke Bryan’s “Drink a Beer.” Now with two albums under his own name, Stapleton, 39, is traveling the arena circuit to sing about drinkin’ and smokin’, lovin’ and leavin’. (Oct. 7, Xcel Energy Center, $35.75-$435, ticketmaster.com)

A$AP Mob

Harlem-reared rap star A$AP Rocky returns with his crew members for a rare all-Mob tour. Notably, 21-year-old Atlanta newcomer Playboi Carti is advertised on the bill, fresh off scoring a platinum hit with his single “Magnolia.” Also due are many of the other A$AP namesakes such as A$AP Twelvyy, A$AP Nast and A$AP Ant — but not A$AP Ferg. (Oct. 14, Skyway Theatre, Mpls., $45, skywaytheatre.com)

Irma Thomas & Preservation Hall

A newly revitalized old institution, Preservation Hall Jazz Band has been backing Thomas, another New Orleans legend, in recent years to great response. At 76, the “Time Is on My Side” singer can still burn up a stage, albeit in shorter bursts. There’s extra meaning to this gig since PHJB recorded its first LP at the old Guthrie in 1964. Enduring gospel music faves the Blind Boys of Alabama also perform. (Oct. 23, Guthrie Theater, Mpls., $35-$65, guthrietheater.org.)

Thomas Rhett

Rhett just dropped his third album, “Life Changes,” which won’t slow his ascent in country music. “Sixteen” talks about pining to be older. “Life Changes” contemplates being in college, majoring in undecided. “Craving You,” a duet with Maren Morris, has already become his eighth No. 1 hit. Don’t be surprised if “Drink a Little Beer,” served with his dad, Rhett Akins, follows. (Oct. 27, Xcel, $27.75-$448, ticketmaster.com)

Arcade Fire

Response has been rather tepid to the Canadian rock troupe’s up-tempo, smiley fifth album, “Everything Now,” but Win Butler, Régine Chassagne and their small army of a band still generate ample excitement with their high-adrenaline, visually stocked live shows. They’re playing songs from all five records on an in-the-round stage. (Oct. 29, Xcel Energy Center, $23.50-$199, ticketmaster.com)

Lindsey Buckingham & Christine McVie

Apparently, the singer-songwriters in Fleetwood Mac are getting restless. Stevie Nicks has been on tour and Buckingham and McVie released a surprise duo album in June. Now they’ve hit the road, showcasing the self-titled album along with a few Buckingham pieces and Mac favorites. (Oct. 30, Northrop, Mpls., $59.50-$199, northrop.umn.edu)

Halsey

Halsey springboarded to pop stardom last year with “Closer,” a collaboration with the Chainsmokers. Her second solo album, “Hopeless Fountain Kingdom,” finds her as a confessional 22-year-old who tries to position herself as an alternative to Taylor, Katy, Selena, Demi and other female pop stars, though she collaborates with some of the same writers/producers. (Nov. 18, Xcel Energy Center, $29.50-$161, ticketmaster.com)

CHRIS RIEMENSCHNEIDER and JON BREAM