Meet the violinist

Minnesota Orchestra principal second violin Peter McGuire discusses his life in music, plays select pieces and answers audience questions for this laid-back event organized by Friends of the Minnesota Orchestra. Tickets include drinks, appetizers and desserts. (6.30 p.m. Thu., Orchestra Hall Atrium, Mpls.; $30, friendsof minnesotaorchestra.org)

Strong finish

The curtain falls on an outstanding St. Paul Chamber Orchestra season. The 2017-18 finale kicks off with a work for an unusual combination of eight violins by American composer Andrew Norman. The title, “Gran Turismo,” references a car racing video game while nodding to the influence of baroque string virtuosity. Then the violins take a breather for Brahms’ Serenade No. 2, with violas as the main string instruments. And finally, the all-hands-on-deck finale is Beethoven’s First Symphony. (11 a.m. & 8 p.m. Fri., 8 p.m. Sat., 2 p.m. Sun.; Ordway Concert Hall, St. Paul; $12-$50, 651-291-1144 or thespco.org)

Young standout

Recently named Musical America’s 2018 Instrumentalist of the Year, 34-year-old Augustin Hadelich is a leading violinist of the millennial generation. He plays Beethoven’s Violin Concerto with the Minnesota Orchestra this week. Also featured is Berlioz’s “Symphonie Fantastique” led by highly rated conductor Jun Märkl. (8 p.m. Fri. & Sat.; Orchestra Hall, Mpls.; $29-$96, 612-371-5656 or minnesotaorchestra.org)

Quality quartet

Violinist Ariana Kim, a Twin Cities native, joined New York’s Aizuri String Quartet two years ago. Her group makes its Minnesota debut on the heels on winning the prestigious M-Prize, an international chamber music competition based in Ann Arbor, Mich. The concert program reflects the quartet’s commitment to living composers, with Minnesota premieres for two American works: “Lift” by Paul Wiancko and “These Memories May Be True” by Lembit Beecher. Also featured is Beethoven’s “Harp” Quartet as well as music by Carlo Gesualdo and Hildegard von Bingen. (7 p.m. Sun., Sundin Music Hall, Hamline University, St. Paul; $15-$25, 651-450-0527 or chamber musicmn.org)

Minnesota Boychoir concert

No fewer than six different ensembles from the Minnesota Boychoir take the stage for the organization’s annual spring concert. With a wide-ranging choice of music, the full conspectus of young male vocalism is celebrated, from age 7 to high schoolers and alumni. (7 p.m. Sun., Ted Mann Concert Hall, Mpls.; free, boychoir.org)

TERRY BLAIN