Scene at the fair

State Fairs Past

Today the State Fair rolls again — butter sculptures, animals, food, rides, shows, things we've never seen and things we do every year. We've got it down pat. 

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Getting on the merry-go-round at the Minnesota State Fair in 1947 was an easy job for Mayor Hubert H. Humphrey and son Bobby. But getting off was harder. When the proprietor discovered that Humphrey was one of the passengers, he kept the merry-go-round going, with free rides.
Three candidates for 1955's Princess Kay dropped in to the Weather-ball room of Northwestern National Bank for a milk party. From left, Doris Krueger, 18, of LeCenter; Joan Poganski, 21, of Sauk Rapids; and Barbara Droppo, 17, Thief River Falls, were among the 16 vying for the crown of the Milky Way.
Gary Schmidt, 18, of Watertown, Minn., fed a snack to Ralph, the subject of the Future Farmers of America hog weight-estimate contest at the Minnesota State Fair in 1973 . Ralph's weight didn't change much because of the tidbit.
On the opening morning of the 1958 State Fair, two Minneapolis families were there bright and early. At left are Mr. and Mrs. Hal Rindal, with their daughter, Karen. The other family: Mr. and Mrs. Ross Farmer, with their sons Jeffrey, 5, and Mark, 3.
Stuntman Kenny Scharf thrilled the grandstand crowd in 1955 with a ramp-ramp-leap at Aut Swenson's Thrillcade. The Thrillcade traveled to fairs around the Midwest, wowing spectators with motorcycle and car tricks and plenty of near-misses.
The cries of barkers, whine of the rides, and the din of shrieking passengers filled the air on the Rotor, a ride on the midway in 1970.
The final stretch on the Giant Slide held one more shriek of fun for a family at the fair in 1980.
In 1965, Princess Kay of the Milky Way Mary Ann Titrud of Clarissa, Minn., had her likeness carved in butter at the Dairy Building by sculptor Donald Schule, a University of Minnesota art graduate student. He also sculpted the other 10 Princess Kay contest finalists in butter over the week.
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