• No one can keep track of every app or website, but that’s no excuse to ignore everything. Be familiar with the most popular apps, including Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter.

• Use parental controls to block movies, videos and apps by age or rating.

• Understand how privacy settings and photo and location tagging can expose your child to unwanted attention from strangers.

• Talk about what’s appropriate to share, including the consequences of bullying, threats and inappropriate photos.

• Establish rules about respecting others’ privacy. No embarrassing photos or stories. (This goes both ways, parents.)

• Keep tabs on kids’ social media use. Understand the apps they’re using, the times they’re using them, and with whom they’re communicating.

• Educate your teen about scams and how to respond to inappropriate behavior. Talk about when to block, report, unfriend, etc.

• Teach them when to ask for help, for example, if they’re sent porn, photos/videos of assaults, or are the victim of threats. If this happens, your teen should not delete the communication but show it to a parent or other trusted adult.

• Don’t be afraid to be the bad guy, taking away online/phone access for a while or making them change passwords.

• Agree to rules about smartphone use — and stick to them. Many parents think it best to keep devices out of the bedroom overnight.

• If you see warning signs or other troubling behavior changes, it might be time to do a spot check of the device without warning, so texts and photos can’t be deleted. Areas to look would include the camera roll and text messages along with photos and messages within all social apps. A web browser history or search history may also be available within the device's web browser.

• Keep the lines of communication open, and treat missteps constructively.

• Find more resources here: http://strib.mn/socialtips

Colleen Kelly is the Star Tribune's mobile and social media editor, and mom to two teens.