New frontier in cancer care: Turning blood into 'living drugs'

New frontier in cancer care: Turning blood into 'living drugs'

With immunotherapy, researchers are using patients' own cells to create "living drugs" that seek and destroy cancer from within the body.

A look at cats' path to domestication

June 23
A look at cats' path to domestication
Felines kept pests at bay and thus were allowed to follow migrating humans.

Yearly wildebeest massacre nourishes an entire ecosystem

June 23
Yearly wildebeest massacre nourishes an entire ecosystem
The annual event on the Serengeti looks awful but is good for the Mara River watershed, according to a new report led by Yale researchers.
State + Local
June 28
The temporary art installation near U.S. Bank Stadium explores the effects of climate change on Minnesota's future bird populations.

Sculpture near stadium tells story of birds, climate change

The idea for "Orbacles" was in part inspired by the bird controversy at U.S. Bank Stadium, which looms over the sculptures on the east side the park.
Nation
June 28

Don't like needles? Flu shots could be replaced by this patch

Doctors and public health experts have high hopes that vaccine patches will boost the number of people who get immunized against the flu.
Nation
June 28

E-mails: EPA official pressured U chemist on House testimony

A University of Minnesota scientist was pressured by the EPA's chief of staff to alter her recent testimony before Congress and play down the agency's dismissal of expert advisers, his e-mails show.
Nation
June 26

Older teens are as sedentary at 60-year-olds, study finds

The adolescent years are when people's bodies are supposed to start the ascent to their physical peak. Teens are growing like beanstalks. Their hormones are…
Science
June 25
During a family portrait in 2000, Molly Nash gives her 4-week-old brother, Adam, a kiss. Molly Nash received some umbilical blood from her brother, saving her from a fatal genetic disease.

'Little Frankenstein,' conceived to save sister, is now a happy teen

Adam Nash was conceived via in vitro fertilization — specifically so doctors at the University of Minnesota could collect stem cells from his umbilical cord blood to save his sister, Molly. Today, back home in Colorado, he has a driver's license and helps disabled children ski.
National
June 24
French President Emmanuel Macron, left, speaks with former US actor an...

Schwarzenegger talks climate change with French president

Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger says the environment shouldn't be a partisan issue.
Science
June 24

Terms to know

Vocabulary lesson As more treatments known as immunotherapies for cancer emerge, here are some terms to know: Immunotherapy: Forms of treatment that use or boost…
Business
June 23

Work to move giant sequoia draws curious Idaho onlookers

Workers in Idaho prepared to inflate rolling tubes beneath a massive sequoia that grew over more than a century from a seed sent by naturalist John Muir. Then, they wrestled the tree up a ramp to street level Friday.
Nation
June 23

Total solar eclipse 1st in 99 years to sweep width of US

This August, the U.S. will experience its first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in 99 years.
Business
June 23
Heat waves ripple across the tarmac at Sky Harbor International Airpor...

Clarification: Science Says-Too Hot To Fly story

In a story June 20, The Associated Press reported that airplanes take off and stay aloft because of lift, the force from the movement of air underneath the plane's wings that push it upward. The story quoted a scientist who explained that heat makes air expand and become less dense, reducing the amount of force the air can exert on the wings. The story should have made clear that lift is created by movement of air both above and underneath the plane's wing. The movement of air above the wing creates an area of low pressure. The movement of air below creates an area of high pressure. That difference pulls the plane up.
Science
June 23

Science briefs: Ongoing coral bleaching in Indian Ocean coming to an end

An ongoing global coral bleaching event, one that’s affected more than 70 percent of tropical reefs worldwide, may finally be coming to a close. A…
Science
June 23
Don Noel carries his daughter Alexis, 8, with his wife Lauren, right a...

Scientists say the rapid sinking of Louisiana's coast already is a 'worst case scenario'

Subsidence rate averages about 9 millimeters a year.
Science
June 23

Health briefs: Airport noise may raise risk for high blood pressure

Airport noise could raise the risk for high blood pressure, a new study suggests. Greek researchers studied 420 people living near Athens International Airport, where…
Science
June 23
A recent study published in the American Journal of Health Economics f...

Get well soon? A healthier roommate could help

A recent study published in the American Journal of Health Economics found that hospital patients who are assigned healthier roommates require less care and are discharged more rapidly.
Science
June 23

'Human Project' study will ask 10,000 people to share life's data

Researchers are gearing up to start recruiting participants from across New York City next year for a study seeking insight on health, aging, education and more.
Variety
June 22

US officials to lift Yellowstone grizzly bear protections

Protections that have been in place for more than 40 years for grizzly bears in the Yellowstone National Park area will be lifted this summer after U.S. government officials ruled Thursday that the population is no longer threatened.
National
June 22

States won't rush approval of Yellowstone grizzly hunts

The Latest on removing Yellowstone region grizzly bears from federal protections (all times local):
Nation
June 21

Fake quake: Report of major California temblor a false alarm

The only tremors from a reported major earthquake off the California coast came on the internet.
State + Local
June 20

U scientists say Trump is overhauling EPA advisory panel

Members of key science advisory panel told to reapply for posts when their term ends.
Variety
June 20

Back-to-back Alaska fatal black bear maulings seen as flukes

Back-to-back fatal maulings of people by black bears in Alaska appear to be flukes by rogue animals, experts said Tuesday. But they warn that people venturing into bear habitat should always carry repellent spray or guns.