Thinking about calling in sick? Prepare for the cold shoulder from work colleagues.

Most of your cube mates — 80 percent, in fact — think you’re sometimes lying. Another 7 percent think you’re — cough! — always lying.

Of course, it’s hard to give them much credence, because they’re a bunch of liars, too. Fully 57 percent of respondents to the Cold-EEZE survey of 1,000 Americans ’fessed up to calling in sick themselves when they were behind on “Orange Is the New Black” episodes.

If you’re really sick, do what Mom would advise. Stay home, get plenty of rest and drink lots of fluids.

If you’re not really sick, but need a day off, a few pointers:

Don’t be fake sick on a Monday or Friday, or the day after a holiday. Seriously.

Avoid off-the-wall excuses. One guy claimed he caught a … plane. And your great-aunt can die only once. Better just to say you have a migraine or food poisoning.

Prepare in advance. Start blowing your nose the day before; tell co-workers at lunch that you’re not eating because you don’t have an appetite.

Stay away from social media and selfies, especially if your “sick day” includes big winnings at Canterbury Park. Seven percent of survey respondents said they’ve tried to find proof of questionable claims by scouring Facebook and other sites, or calling the employee’s home.

Don’t push it. Enjoy your mental-health day. You may very well have earned it. Now get your refreshed self back to work and pick up the slack. □

gail.rosenblum@startribune.com